FORM Issue Extra: Workbook: Lines and Dots: Patterns That Demand Attention

Kennerly Architecture's design for a San Francisco Victorian emphasizes verticality. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

Kennerly Architecture’s design for a San Francisco Victorian emphasizes verticality. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

In our July/August print edition, we explore pattern in architecture. From dots to squares to lines, architects deploy pattern both as a formal and a functional element. The Janus house, by Kennerly Architecture, goes for elegant straight lines, as you’ll learn from this excerpt from our Workbook section.

As the name implies, this 4,200-square-foot house, located in the Lower Haight neighborhood of San Francisco, boasts two faces—one that embraces the historical Victorian façade and a second more modern profile. The design team preserved three main areas of the home: the northern façade, the gabled massing, and the proportion and arrangement of the front interior rooms. “We preserved [the façade], replacing the windows in kind including the leaded glass, and painted it a deep monochromatic palette with silver accents that enhances the sense of its textures and conveys a contemporary edge,” says principal Owen Kennerly.

The house's well-preserved Victorian façade. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

The house’s well-preserved Victorian façade. Photography by Bruce Damonte.

The opposite side of the house expresses a more contemporary façade. The architect chose a flattering vertical, linear design that wouldn’t appear heavy handed. “We varied the spacing and divided the facade into four horizontal courses—corresponding with window heads and sills—that cut the verticals so the pattern can syncopate,” he says.

Inside the home, the designer preserved the handsome scale and proportion of the front rooms “but we dissolved this fabric a bit, by making doors wider and taller, to allow better circulation and visual flow” says Kennerly. Upstairs, they “excavated” the attic space to create gabled bedrooms for the family.

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