Annenberg exhibit explores global water scarcity

Now through Feb. 15, 2016, the Aquarium of the Pacific will showcase the exhibit, Water: Our Thirsty Worldfeaturing images captured by National Geographic magazine photographers that examine water scarcity and humans’ relationship with water around the world. The exhibition was organized by the Annenberg Foundation in Los Angeles in partnership with National Geographic.

“At the Aquarium, we want to familiarize our visitors with global environmental issues and inspire them to think about their own reliance on natural resources like freshwater. The remarkable photographs in this exhibition give visitors a new entry point into the issue of water scarcity and may cause them to think differently about our relationship with nature,” says Aquarium President and CEO Dr. Jerry Schubel.

Here, we feature some of the striking images on display that articulate the beauty and power of water.

The Maya believed natural wells, such as the Xkeken cenote in Mexico’s Yucatán, led to the underworld. Water flows through human existence, scribing a line between life and death.  —John Stanmeyer, VII Mexico, 2009

The Maya believed natural wells, such as the Xkeken cenote in Mexico’s Yucatán, led to the underworld. Water flows through human existence, scribing a line between life and death. —John Stanmeyer, VII Mexico, 2009

 

Girls from a West Bank village cool off in the briny waters of the Dead Sea, the world’s deepest saltwater lake. Naturally buoyant waters make it a favorite of bathers. Yet levels are dropping more than three feet a year. —Paolo Pellegrin, Magnum Photos Israel, 2009

Girls from a West Bank village cool off in the briny waters of the Dead Sea, the world’s deepest saltwater lake. Naturally buoyant waters make it a favorite of bathers. Yet levels are dropping more than three feet a year. —Paolo Pellegrin, Magnum Photos, Israel, 2009

Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.—Theo Allofs, Corbis Australia, 2006

Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.—Theo Allofs, Corbis, Australia, 2006

2009India’s holiest river, the Ganges, is scribbled with light from floating oil lamps during the Ganga Dussehra festival in Haridwar. Hindus near death often bathe in the river; some are later cremated beside it and have their ashes scattered in its depths. —John Stanmeyer, VII India, 2009

2009India’s holiest river, the Ganges, is scribbled with light from floating oil lamps during the Ganga Dussehra festival in Haridwar. Hindus near death often bathe in the river; some are later cremated beside it and have their ashes scattered in its depths. —John Stanmeyer, VII India, 2009

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