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Jack Skelley has over 25 years of experience at publications ranging from Harper’s magazine to the Los Angeles Times. He specializes in issues surrounding urban design, including architecture, real estate and urban planning. A senior partner at Paolucci Communication Arts, Skelley edits the firm’s “marketeering and urbaneering” e-newsletter and blog, The Hot Sheet. He serves on the Executive Committee of Urban Land Institute, Los Angeles and writes frequently for FORM, Urban Land and Riviera magazine, where he is a Contributing Writer. Other publications include Los Angeles magazine, LAist.com, Angeleno, Riviera Interiors, L.A. Weekly, Wired, Salon, Buzz, PlanNetizen.com, California Homes and California magazine. He is an active blogger on Politico, Curbed L.A., and Huffington Post.

Skelley recently co-edited a book, Los Angeles, Building the Polycentric City, for Congress for the New Urbanism. At Los Angeles Downtown News he served in a series of top positions, including Executive Editor and Associate Publisher.

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Main | Urbanists Notice That Arcade Fire Rocks 'The Suburbs' »
Tuesday
Nov232010

Chris Burden's Hot Wheels Auto-Urbanism Coming to LACMA

Artist Chris Burden gave conceptual art a real shot in the arm back in 1971 when he had someone fire a rifle at him. Since then he’s evolved into creating elaborate, entertaining museum-scale installations. The latest, coming soon to Los Angeles County Museum of Art is “Metropolis II.” It includes 1,200 custom-designed Hot Wheels-style cars and 18 lanes; 13 toy trains and tracks; and buildings made of wood block, tiles, Legos and Lincoln Logs. Burden’s crew is completing the installation at his Topanga studio, according to LACMA. Check out the video and you can see the scale and significance of the artwork: It seems to capture the multitudes of autos in today’s cities, but its tiny toyishness puts the experience in an aloof – perhaps absurdist – perspective.

-Jack Skelley

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