LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




                                     

Michael Webb
writes on modern architecture, design, and travel. He is the author of 26 books, most recently Modernist Paradise: Niemeyer House, Boyd Collection (Rizzoli) and Venice CA: Art +Architecture in a Maverick Community (Abrams). He travels widely in search of new and classic modern architecture and contributes to magazines around the world. Michael lives in the Neutra apartment that Charles and Ray Eames once called home.

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden

Michael Webb

Tuesday
Nov262013

Books: An Unheralded Brazilian Modernist

By Michael Webb

Lina Bo Bardi. Zeuler R.M. de A. Lima (Yale University Press, $65).

Niemeyer aside, Latin American architecture has received far too little attention in the US, so this scholarly monograph on Lina Bo Bardi (1914-92) is especially welcome. It examines the career of an architect who won attention as a critic and designer in her native Italy, moved to Brazil in 1946, and struggled to realize a radical vision. In her 45 years of residence, she completed only 14 projects, but they include a house of rare distinction and two major public works, all in the city of São Paolo. The MASP Museum of Modern Art comprises glass-walled galleries suspended from two massive, long-span concrete frames, shading a public plaza and revealing the park beyond. The SESC Pompeia Leisure Center is an adult play structure: two raw concrete volumes linked with bridges and lit from biomorphic openings.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Nov192013

Exhibition Review: Celebrating the Machine in Twenties Paris

Leger: Modern Art and the Metropolis at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is a dazzling exhibition with a misleading title. In the 1920s, Berlin, not Paris, defined the metropolis, and German artists had a love-hate relationship with its oppressive streets, flashing lights, and surging crowds. Filmmakers followed their lead—in Berlin: Symphony of a Great City, People on Sunday, and the dystopian vision of Metropolis.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Nov042013

Book Review: The Building Impulse

By Michael Webb

Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture. Rowan Moore (HarperDesign, $30).

Rowan Moore is the outspoken architectural critic of The Observer, one of the last serious newspapers in Britain—a market increasingly dominated by tawdry tabloids. His commentaries on new buildings can be found on the Web site of The Guardian, a liberal daily owned by the same non-profit trust. In Why We Build, he has stepped back to reflect on a broad swathe of architecture and the forces that shape it.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Oct142013

Exhibitions: Architecture in Photographs

Louis-Émile Durandelle (French, 1839 - 1917); Exposition universelle de 1889 / État d'avancement, November 23, 1888; Albumen silver print; 43.2 x 34.6 cm (17 x 13 5/8 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.In Focus: Architecture, a small, but exquisite exhibition at the Getty Museum, samples a favorite subject of photographers, from the invention of the medium in 1839 to the present. Architecture in Photographs is the title of a book by Gordon Baldwin, comprising 75 images from the Getty’s fabulous collection, and assistant photography curator Amanda Maddox has selected a third of these for her exhibition. Book and show offer a fascinating commentary on the evolution of the medium and the speed of its growth. Within a decade of the first images by Daguerre in France and Henry Fox Talbot in England, photographers had fanned out across the world, recording monuments, people and natural wonders. The cameras were cumbersome, the processing laborious, but these pioneers were undeterred, and they created a priceless record of a now-vanished world. Monumental buildings were favorite subjects, because they were static, could be pictured in constantly shifting light, and offered a ready-made composition for the photographer to interpret.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Sep172013

Book Review: Recalling a Modern Master

By Michael Webb

It’s Modern: The Eye and Visual Influence of Alexander Liberman. Charles Churchward. Rizzoli, $65.

There’s a fairy tale quality about the life and careers of Alexander Lieberman. An emigré from Kiev, he was briefly touched by the Russian avant garde, edited the first magazine of photo journalism in Paris in the 1930s, narrowly escaped to the US in 1941, was swiftly fired from his first two jobs but spent the next 50 years in art direction at Condé Nast. Even as he honed his reputation as an artist and social lion, he became editorial director of the entire publishing empire, from Vogue to Allure. He re-launched Vanity Fair and House & Garden and inaugurated new titles. Nobody will ever again exercise such authority and for so long. Adaptability was his greatest gift. An exacting stylist, he could reconceive magazines every decade and for every demographic, remaking layouts for hours at a time, before returning to his Connecticut studio to work on an abstract painting or sculpture.

Click to read more ...