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Events 

Venice/Santa Monica Modern Home Tour
May 3, 2014

The Venice/Santa Monica Modern Home Tour gives L.A. residents a chance to explore and view some of the greatest examples of modern architecture right in their own area, via self-guided driving tour. Attendees learn from homeowners what it's like to live in a modern home and find out where the architects got their inspiration - directly from the architects themselves. The tour is self-guided and self-driven, allowing guests to explore these modern treasures at their own pace.

RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014

May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums.

Heath Open Studio Events
May 9–11
The traditional Spring event, where Heath opens the doors to the factory and studio so visitors can explore both Heath's history, as well as current projects and collections, will be held at the company's San Franciso, Sausalito and Los Angeles locations.

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.

de LaB Presents an Eastside Home Tour: Architects at Home
May 10, 2014
De LaB presents its second annual Eastside home tour, “Architects at Home,” on May 10th from 12:00-4:00 p.m. The popular tour will explore homes designed and built by architects for their own families. A sense of experimentation, playfulness, inspiration, and a creative approach to budget constraints pervade these homes.

The Venice Art Walk
May 18, 2014
The proud tradition of artists and volunteers providing health care to their neighbors in need and the celebration of Venice’s vibrant artistic culture continues today. This event is free and open to the public and features a highly anticipated 350 piece art auction, live entertainment, and an impressive lineup of gourmet food trucks. Participants can purchase tickets to highly regarded Architecture Tours that held throughout the year and/or view exclusive art studios that will be featured on the day of Venice Art Walk & Auctions.

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Celebrate: Groundswell
June 28, 2014
A+D Architecture and Design Museum > Los Angeles (A+D) celebrates its 13th year of cutting edge exhibitions and progressive architecture and design programs with its annual gala and fundraiser.

 

Competitions

Deadline: April 25
Call for Entries (Student Awards) 
ASLA 

Deadline: June 1 
AIA|LA 2014 Design Awards Program Registration 
AIA|LA

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

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Friday
May042012

Q&A: Calvin Abe, Landscape Architect and Co-Curator of Ecoartspace

Images by Hirokazu KosakaThe Japanese American Cultural & Community Center hosted its first annual spring festival, called the LA Bloom Festival, from April 27 to May 5. The centerpiece of the festival was the Ecoartspace installation, co-curated by local landscape architect Calvin Abe and JACCC Artistic Director Hirokazu Kosaka. Ecoartspace transformed the Noguchi Plaza into one of the world’s largest Zen gardens with over 5 million pebbles raked to create puddles of raindrops. To commemorate this space-activating endeavor combining landscape architecture, art, and Zen practice, FORM spoke with Ahbe Landscape Architects Principal Calvin Abe about the significance of the event.

Why is this activity of importance to the neighborhood or community? What is it about activating this plaza in this creative way that is compelling to you?

The Naguchi Plaza is owned by the Community Center as a non-profit organization. This is one of the only, if not the only, public plaza that is within the private domain. I guess LA Live is a public private space. This particular space has been there for over 30 years and was designed by Naguchi. It has always been kind of a hidden gem. It has been used as a focal point for community festivals and events, but it is offset and not terribly visible from the street. It doesn’t have a direct street presence because of the way that Naguchi designed the space. It has the quality of a secret garden. It is a secret public plaza space. Most people don’t know about it. This installation is one of many installations over the years to engage the people and the public, to bring people into the space, to let people know about this unique space in the Downtown community.

Besides the public and the private, the other mixing of worlds evident in this nine-day event is the blending of the traditional and the modern. Can you elaborate on how those dynamics played out over the course of the event?

I was thinking about the importance of the installation as the idea of the garden. This particular installation speaks to my interest in sustainability and the connection between human experience and nature. In this case, the simplicity of the modernist expression of the gravel gardens evokes what I call a spiritual experience. The natural environment, as with most Zen gardens, has to do with the inner workings of oneself—the contemplative qualities that the garden space can create. We had to create a garden space that was at scale that has a major presence. It is a spiritual space—that is a connection back to nature. That is part of the whole idea of ecoartspace.

Given your role in planning the event, what do JACCC stakeholders hope for from the event in terms of neighborhood revitalization? What makes Little Tokyo great and what investments could take the neighborhood to the next level of a livable and engaging community?

We are fortunate that the population of Downtown, in particular Little Tokyo, is shifting. We are now finding many residents in the area. Little Tokyo has become one of the major areas for night activities. It is very active in the evenings with youth and events and dining. The space is an opportunity for these types of events to occur to encourage further community, further community engagement, and a place to hang out. The whole week will see evening social events that we hope people will take part in. We’re really a part of a larger economic growth that is hapopening—I don’t know if it is growth, but it is definitely a shift. The Community Center wants to be a part of that so we aren’t just Japanese Americans, but we’re part of a larger urban fabric that can host activities Downtown.

How did you expertise and experience as a landscape architect help you curate the event?

There are two parts. One is a practical side. On the conceptual side is the relationship to the Zen Garden. Hirokazu Kosaka is the public artist that I worked with—we co-curated this installation. We were interested in transforming the plaza into a new experience. As a boardmember at the community center, I said, “why don’t we skew this installation to make sure we have an environmental plan.” Out of that I threw out the idea of Ecoartspace, and the comittee picked that up and pushed that idea. Because my background as a landscape architect includes a lot of work in sustainability and ecological systems approach to design, that’s how we collaborated. 

On the practical side, I had the 27 tons of gravel organized, delivered, and installed. I paid for it. I hired labor to spread it and install. There are three inches—a lot of gravel out there. I was able to make that happen through my industry connections .

LA Bloom concludes on May 5, so you have one last Saturday to check out the event.
 


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