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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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« Exhibitions: Architecture in Photographs | Main | WEB EXTRA: Talking Airports with John Marx »
Wednesday
Oct092013

FORM Trends: Talking Offices with Blake Zalcberg

Office furniture is becoming more multifunctional and multi-use says Blake Zalcberg, CEO of OFM. Image via OFM.A lot of ink gets spilled about the modern office. We’ve certainly discussed on this site. We hear a lot about creating open work environments that foster creativity and don’t tie employees to specific desk or space. Instead, the impulse is to afford workers the opportunity to move around—from lounge to conference area to even a garden. While that scenario might work for a lot of companies in a lot of fields, there are plenty of places where it’s just not feasible.

Blake Zalcberg, CEO of OFM, an office furnishings company based in North Carolina, has a different take on the matter. “Collaboration is great if you welcome it, and that’s your culture,” he says. “To create all space as a collaborative space is problematic.” For him, certain jobs, sales for example, don’t necessarily lend themselves to being done in open environments. He also points out that, for some, open workplaces are not the right fit for some employees.  “It’s about the right space and the right time and the right personnel,” he notes. 

In his own industry, he sees manufacturers creating products specifically geared to open spaces with non-traditional layouts. But, he thinks there are limits to the trend. Instead, “What we’re seeing is multipurpose and multiuse furniture. There are more things on wheels,” he says “We have a brand new series of seating that includes a tuck away tablet area. You can now take your conference room and just put eight chairs in it and use a tablet or mobile device.” In part, this development is an outgrowth of shrinking office footprint in general, where spaces might serve several purposes. Modular options will continue to be a force in his world. “You can put wheels on them, change height, connect or gang them together,” he says, meaning all the furniture doesn’t have to be replaced. 

In the end, “Trends are interesting things,” he notes. “They’re hard to chase.” 

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