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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

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Tuesday
Nov122013

Workbook: Bringing Home to Work

Studio O+A's design for Zazzle's headquarters emphasizes multi-functional spaces and unexpected design touches. Photo by Jasper Sanidad/Courtesy Studio O+A.We talk a lot about the new look of offices—open-plan, flooded with natural light, multi-use spaces. Often, though, designers and architects don’t take that idea to the next level, instead creating spaces that still very much retain the old aesthetic  that leans toward the institutional and bland. For a recent project by Studio O+A, a San Francisco–based interior design studio, the team pushed the envelope, creating offices for the online firm Zazzle in Redwood City, California, that are lively and inviting. 

“They wanted something that would not just look great, but be well made,” explains Denise Cherry, a principal and the director of design at the firm. “They really viewed the space as their home.” As such, the furnishings and finishes speak a more residential language. Bold-patterned wallpaper covers some offices, while furniture choices run the gamut from classic Eames office chairs to Shaker-inspired pieces produced locally. There’s even a curvy couch paired with a funky upholstered ottoman and London-style phone booths pop up around the space. “It’s more curated instead of just pulling of pieces from same manufacturer,” says senior design Elizabeth Guerrero. 

Though walls are few and far between, the designers created an ingenious method of marking spaces, using floor and ceiling transitions. In practice, it means that concrete defines circulation paths and the break room; cork designates the communal zones; and offices and conference rooms are carpeted. The break room is further set apart, visually, by its ceiling, which is covered in ceramic tile. Cherry notes, though, “the nicest spaces are the communal ones.”

One of the most delightful multi-use spaces has to be the game room/conference room. With game nights a part of the company’s culture, the designers created a space for them. Since they only happen once a week, the space doubles as a conference room, with walls that can be brought down for privacy—business meetings can be conducted from the comfort of leather armchairs arranged around a poker table.

“We never went too far but had fun with things,” says Cherry. “This was the space they always wanted.”

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