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Events

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
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Wednesday
Nov132013

State of Sustainability: The Smallest Details Get an Earth-Friendly Makeover

Paradigm Trends now manufactures a line of bath accessories crafted of mango wood as the market for sustainable hospitality accessories grows. Image courtesy Paradigm Trends.Hotels, by their very nature, can be some of the least-environmentally places around, but these days that reputation is changing.  Hotels—both their designs and their furnishings—are looking more sustainable as developers and owners increasingly go for LEED certification for reasons both altruistic and practical.

To that end, designers and architects are incorporating more sustainable products into their projects, prompting manufacturers to expand their ranges to meet the increased demand. For Bette Lissak, president of Paradigm Trends, a manufacturer of accessories with a large base of hospitality clients, “It started about five years ago and has been getting stronger and evolving.”

For starters, over the last 30 years or so, the company has been meeting their clients’ needs by offering metal products made with recycled aluminum, stainless steel and brass. More recently, Lissak notes, there was a push into bamboo. “Now they want something that looks natural rather than highly finished,” she says, as designers envision rooms that have more of a home-like—and less of an industrial—feel. Enter mango wood. It’s widely available and can take all sorts of finish treatments. “It’s more adaptable, well-priced and easy for us to use,” notes Lissak.

Some of the company’s new products also address earth-friendly requirements. For example, by popular demand, Paradigm Trends now offers a dual-chamber wastebasket so trash and recycling can be separated in-room, a new mandate for types of green certification. With clients ranging from The Ritz-Carlton to Canyon Ranch, Lissak doesn’t see the shift to sustainable products as a merely a flash in the pan. “People are looking at it as an asset,” Lissak points out. 

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