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RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014
May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums. 

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.


Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century. 

 

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Wednesday
Nov202013

FORM Tech: The Cuckoo Clock Gets a Makeover

The design collective Stilnest.com focuses on digital art and 3D printing. Their most recent undertaking is a cuckoo clock created by five designers on two continents. Image courtesy Stilnest.com.They may have veered into the realm of kitsch a while ago, but cuckoo clocks are wonderfully evocative of a time, a place and a craft tradition. Those factors, then, would seem to make them a prime target for re-imagining in the 21st century. That’s exactly what recently happened in a happening spanning continents and time zones.

Devised by Stilnest.com, a German outfit with a focus on digital art and 3D printing, the Cuckoo Project brought together artists from Europe (Utrecht, Ghent, London and Berlin) and North America (Mexico City). Some had already collaborated with Stilnest, and some were new additions to the group. All were chosen because of their facility with 3D printed design.  

“We think of Stilnest.com as a spreading design collective of carefully selected international artists,” notes co-founder Tim Bibow. “And the cuckoo clock is a symbol for this attitude towards design and 3D printing. Our vision is to build a whole new ecosystem around design, to hack the world of design with the help of all these great artists from around the world, united by the beauty of contemporary manufacturing.”

The entire process took about five weeks, from its initial design to the final printing, with all of the designers tackling different parts of the clock—from the movement to the cuckoo itself. “It was very difficult to merge all the designs to get the clock printed in one piece,” says Bibow. “As every designer used a different kind of CAD software, the digital integration of every piece of design was a stressful process for our 3D printing expert Florian Krebs.” Nevertheless, the efforts paid off, and the clock they created is a stunning riff on its inspiration from the Black Forest.

For the group, the most surprising part of the project was the end result—the clock actually worked. Says Bibow, “We did such an exacting piece of work for the first project, it was a kind of experiment and at some stages of the process, we had to question, if all the 3D printed mechanics were going to work. And, as the print was expensive and time was running, we had only one chance to make it happen. All of us were so happy to see the cuckoo popping out of the door, finally!”

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