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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Tuesday
Feb122013

Architecture News from Antarctica

Hugh Broughton Architects and AECOM designed a series of eight interlocking modules on skis for the new Halley VI Research Station in Antarctica. Image, © BASEven under the best circumstances, the practice of architecture is a challenging proposition. Now imagine designing structures for one of the harshest places on earth. That was the task Hugh Broughton, of Hugh Broughton Architects, faced in creating a new Antarctic research station on the Brunt Ice Shelf. 
"The brief for Halley VI provided us with some enormous design challenges: to create the first ever fully re-locatable research station ever built in the polar regions which could cope with constantly rising snow levels and provide a stimulating working and living environment for a winter crew isolated from the world for nine months at a time and subjected to three months of total darkness. Add to that the freezing temperatures and high winds, and it was clear a special solution was necessary,” says Broughton.
A view of the station during winter. The structures' innovative design will allow flexibility in terms of configuration and location. Image, © Sam BurrellWorking in close collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (the group whose research first identified the whole in the ozone layer), as well as AECOM, the firm created a series of eight hydraulically elevated ski-based modules that can be rearranged based on the needs of the scientists in residence. The seven interconnected blue modules, constructed by Galliford Try, function as bedrooms, laboratories, offices and energy plants. A red two-story red module serves as a social area. As the ice it sits on shifts, the modules can be moved and reconfigured in more secure locations.
Think you’re up for an Antarctic challenge of your own? The Institute of Architects of Brazil (IAB) and the Brazilian navy recently launched a contest to renovate the Comandante Ferraz Antarctic Station on King George Island’s Keller Peninsula, where it’s home to a naval and research staff that ranges from over 30 to over 60. Besides either replacing or renovating all the buildings on the site, the winning project will incorporate a range of new, efficient technologies to create a complex that is livable and sustainable. If you’re interested, the deadline for entries is March 14. More details are here. Good luck and stay warm!

 

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