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Events

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Japanese Design Today 100
June 27–July 19, 2014
The Japan Foundation presents the World premiere of the exhibition Japanese Design Today 100, which opens at UCLA’s Department of Architecture & Urban Design at Perloff Hall. This exhibition showcases the Designscape of contemporary Japan through 100 objects of Japanese design: 89 objects created since 2010 that are well known in Japan, as well as 11 objects that represent the origin of Japanese post-war modern product design. These 100 product designs are displayed in 10 categories: Classic Japanese Design, Furniture & Housewares, Tableware & Cookware, Apparel & Accessories, Children, Stationery, Hobbies, Healthcare, Disaster Relief, and Transportation.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration
July 17, 2014
Construction is nearing midpoint at the downtown Berkeley site of the future home of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA). Workers will soon be erecting the last of the steel beams that form the frame of this dynamic building. To celebrate this important milestone, BAM/PFA invites its Bay Area friends and neighbors to a “topping out” ceremony on Addison Street, between Shattuck Avenue and Oxford Street.

39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show
August 8–10, 2014

The American Craft Council returns to San Francisco for its 39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show this August 8-10, 2014 at Fort Mason Center. As the largest juried fine craft show on the West Coast, the 2014 San Francisco Show is expected to draw more than 12,000 fine craft collectors and design enthusiasts.

Conversations in Place 2014
August 10, 2014
ow in its third year, Conversations in Place 2014 begins another series of illuminating explorations of “Southern California – Yesterday and Tomorrow” at the historic Rancho Los Alamitos. The 4-part series begins Sunday, August 10 and continues through Sunday, November 2. The series begins with W. Richard West, Jr, President and CEO of The Autry National Center of the American West, Milford Wayne Donaldson, FAIA, chairman of the United States Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Pamela Seager, Executive Director of Rancho Los Alamitos, and Architect Stephen Farneth, FAIA, founding partner of the award-winning historic preservation firm Architectural Resources Group, in conversation about the place of museums and historic sites in shaping the story of Southern California. Can these institutions escape the straightjacket of the time to better interpret history to the 21st century?

NOW AND NEXT 2014 Symposium on Technology for Design and Construction
August 13–15, 2014
Meet thought leaders and colleagues interested in architecture, engineering, construction, open BIM Exchange, software trends and more. Learn about the innovations that are moving companies and people forward
including: where and how design and delivery is shifting; which software applications are transformative; best practices for collaborative project delivery; how to engage with the global BIM community. Connect with and hear from the best and the brightest such as Jordan Brandt, AutoDesk; Deke Smith, buildingSMART alliance; Ray Topping, Fiatech; Bill East, Prairie  Sky Consulting (formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers).

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

Competitions

Deadline: August 18
Fabric
Formabilio


Deadline: September 2
Hansgrohe+Axor Das Design Competition
Hansgrohe+Axor


Deadline: September 5

2014 Designer Dream Bath Competition
Duravit

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Fit for Champions | Main | Designing the Future: A Conversation with Jamie Wolfond »
Wednesday
Feb272013

A Closer Look at Catherine Opie

Catherine Opie, Tavir (Gas Station), inkjet print, Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles © Catherine Opie The built environment of Los Angeles has served as a muse for Catherine Opie for over 25 years. From the city’s freeways to the gated homes of Bel Air to the shopkeepers of West Adams, Opie has focused her lens on all.

On Saturday, March 2, Catherine Opie will join the ranks of previous awardees Iwan Baan and Richard Barnes as the recipient of the 4th annual Julius Shulman Institute Excellence in Photography Award. Opie will receive the award at the opening of the exhibition Catherine Opie: In & Around L.A. at the Woodbury University Hollywood Gallery (WUHO). Included in the show—and exhibited for the first time in LA—will be photographs from her Shopkeepers series documenting small businesses in Opie’s West Adams neighborhood.

We had a chance to talk with Emily Bills, who, along with Karin Higa, curated the exhibition, Opie and her work.

FORM: Why choose Catherine Opie as this year's recipient of the Julius Shulman Photography Award?

Emily Bills: Catherine Opie has been photographing the built environment since her graduate student days at CalArts in Los Angeles. Although she became celebrated for her portraits of the S/M community, of which she was a part, it was a series of quiet, diminutive photographs of L.A.’s freeways that surprised the art community. Since that time Opie has consistently framed the way we think about community, politics, urban development, and domestic space through exquisite prints that challenge us to look closely at the physical spaces that make up our everyday experience.

F: How does her work fit in/depart from that of previous recipients?

EB: The Julius Shulman Institute strives to bring attention to photographers who challenge the way we view the built environment, and this is true for all our recipients. While on the surface Opie’s work may seem very different from that of Iwan Baan and Richard Barnes, I see more similarities than departures. Like Baan, for example, Opie's early photography education was documentary in nature and there is a strong social component to their work. Unlike past recipients, her work doesn’t straddle the world between commercial architectural photography and traditional art practice, but we believe that line is becoming more and more blurred, and for good reason.

F: How did you end up choosing the works you included?

EB: Opie has produced an incredibly diverse body of work on the built environment that stretches, for example, from Freeways in Los Angeles (1994) to Wall Street in New York just before 9/11 (2001), to Icehouses in Missouri (2001), to photographs of lesbian couples in their domestic environments all across the country (1998). Despite this rich array of work, Karin Higa and I really wanted to focus on Los Angeles, the place where Opie has lived and produced art for most of her professional life. Her work documents environments that, when combined together in this exhibition, provide an understanding of the city’s diverse communities and the people that occupy and shape them. We were also mindful of Julius Shulman’s own love of Los Angeles and the significance of showing Opie’s very different, but equally influential way of framing how we see the city.

F: Can you talk a bit about the two ends of the economic/class spectrum portrayed in her work?

EB: I think Opie’s interested in the politics of place, particularly how people shape their environments to reflect their vision of themselves and how they want to communicate to the world. We might compare the Bel Air and Beverly Hills Houses series to the Shopkeepers and In and Around Home series, the last two of which were photographed in Opie’s West Adams neighborhood. The facades in Houses are in many ways a disconcerting pastiche of architectural styles that suggest their owners want to claim a kind of European cultural legitimacy, but are confused about how to do so. Fronted by gates and hedges, the message is one of restriction. This is a portrait of a closed community. Although her camera frames the Shopkeepers in a similar manner—one-point perspective, vivid color, attention to decorative details—there is an openness missing from the Houses. The people in Opie’s West Adams neighborhood are available to be photographed, not locked behind doors. In Houses the occupants shape their individual identity through the manipulation of private property. In In and Around Home photographs like Monica Lewinsky Mural and Tree Stump Christ show how shared spaces such as an abandoned lot or sidewalk planter become opportunities for community expression.

F: Would you say that her perspective on LA has changed during the course of work on the city?

EB: I think there are some shared ideas that run through most of her work, despite the fact that she tends to work in distinct series. Almost all of the work has a documentary quality to it. All seem influenced by the history of portraiture, even the photographs that don’t include people. Her more recent work, Shopkeepers and In and Around Home focus less on infrastructure and more on the people who occupy communities.

F: What does her work say about the past and the future of LA?

EB: In a recent conversation with the artist, she suggested that the work might someday function as an archeological record of our city. I think what she meant is that her photographs of different neighborhoods reflect the everyday L.A. and not a staged version of what L.A. tries to project about itself to the world. If we really want to understand the city, we can look at her intimate portraits of shopkeepers in their working environments in West Adams, or the Bel Air and Beverly Hills house facades that are a curious pastiche of architectural history. I think her photographs also serve as documents of spaces that are undergoing continuous change. In Landscape 4, the steep, grassy hill off of Doheny Drive is marked with a real estate sale sign, and we can bet much of that natural environment has been developed. It is not a static city, but one that is constantly being built, rebuilt, and repurposed.

The show runs until March 24, 2013. For more information visit here.

 

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