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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

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Tuesday
Mar192013

Showroom: Coryne Lovick Makes Modern Comfortable

Coryne Lovick's Z Chair features a zig-zag profile. Photo courtesy Coryne Lovick Collection.

Some people collect stamps. Others collect teapots. Designer Coryne Lovick collects chairs. The interior designer has been acquiring them for years—scouring flea markets for intriguing seats and amassing a collection that has come to require storage. In her design work, too, chairs have played a starring role. “When I put unique chairs in my own jobs, they were almost pieces of art on their own and could set a room apart,” she explains. And therein lay a problem.

As a chair aficionado, always looking for stunning seating statements for her projects, Lovick says she “saw an increasingly growing hole in the marketplace for interesting, different and comfortable chairs.” She took matters into her own hands and recently launched her first-ever furniture collection featuring a range of chairs inspired by some of her vintage finds. The line runs the gamut from contemporary riffs on classic designs such as wing chairs and club chairs (complete with cabriole legs) to more modern looks.

The Z Chair also comes in an armless option—perfect for use as a dining chair or occasional chair. Photo courtesy Coryne Lovick Collection.

In particular, Lovick’s Z Chair has a particularly 21st-century feel. Based on a vintage design that captured her heart, “The shape of this chair is totally unique for the marketplace,” she says. “You can add buttons to make it retro or add nail heads to make it more traditional. Although I present it as a dining chair it works as a side chair in any living space. Upholster it in a multicolor hide and it becomes quite a conversation piece and really makes a statement in the room.”

If you’re LA this week for the Pacific Design Center’s Westweek, stop by the Mimi London showroom there to check out her collection. The space “is a true icon of the design industry,” Lovick notes.

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