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RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014
May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums. 

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.


Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century. 

 

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Deadline: December 31
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« Workbook: New Life for a Historic DC Building | Main | Web Extra: A Look at the Firmeza Foundation »
Thursday
Apr252013

Workbook: Standard Reinvents the Lemonade Stand in Beverly Hills

Standard's design for the Pressed Juicery's Beverly Hills store features oak timbers arranged according to the FIbonacci Code. Image courtesy Benny Chan | fotoworks.When Hayden Slater, one of the minds behind the Pressed Juicery, approached the architecture firm Standard, helmed by Jeffrey Allsbrook and Silvia Kuhle, he was thinking big and small. In addition to a space in Beverly Hills (it would ultimately become both the design idea lab and flagship for the company), Slater and his partners planned on rolling out several more locations, ranging in size from small to smaller. They wanted a firm that could create a concept flexible enough to fit a compact storefront on down to almost a niche, with elements that could be incorporated or not without diminishing the character of the brand.

Almost immediately, Allsbrook and Kuhle zeroed on the lemonade stand as one of their guiding principles. “They never mentioned lemonade stand as a template, but we used it internally almost from the start,” Allsbrook says. The architects also saw white oak as central to their design. It reflected the chalkboard elements of the company’s Web site and offered a fresher, more sophisticated riff on the reclaimed wood found at the company’s original location. “Reclaimed wood conveys a certain image,” says Allsbrook, “but it’s kind of played out, especially in the market they’re positioning themselves in.”

In the Beverly Hills location, they did not simply panel flat surfaces with the white oak and call it a day. Instead, to give the space texture and interest, Kuhle and Allsbrook looked to the Fibonacci Sequence as inspiration for the wood’s installation. Now the storefront, counter, walls and ceiling of the Beverly Hills store feature a rhythmic pattern of the timbers. Actual chalkboards appear, too, and have been incorporated into the design for the supplement holders; white subway tiles line the walls. The effect is fresh and minimal and perfectly conveys the product and the brand’s image. 

At the same time Allsbrook and Kuhle were designing the Beverly Hills location, Slater and his partners continued to expand their business—expanding Standard’s portfolio too. “We got to play with Beverly Hills,” recalls Allsbrook. Then the subsequent spaces started coming—fast. “We had to do downtown simultaneously, then Studio City. We designed a truck for them in Malibu as a glorified woody station wagon.” Says Kuhle, “There was lots to do all at once, but we could see it working as we were finishing the prototype.”

In the end, designing multiples sites proved to be a boon for the pair, as they saw in practice how their idea of creating discrete, easily transferrable design elements (white oak on the walls, storefront and ceilings, subway tiles, chalkboards, concrete floors) might or might not be adapted to different spaces. “Changes happened on the others. But with Beverly Hills, when we came back, the design and technical problems had been solved,” says Allsbrook. The result is a group of discrete elements that can be easily transferred in part or entirely to each new location, while maintaining the company's identity.

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