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Events

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Japanese Design Today 100
June 27–July 19, 2014
The Japan Foundation presents the World premiere of the exhibition Japanese Design Today 100, which opens at UCLA’s Department of Architecture & Urban Design at Perloff Hall. This exhibition showcases the Designscape of contemporary Japan through 100 objects of Japanese design: 89 objects created since 2010 that are well known in Japan, as well as 11 objects that represent the origin of Japanese post-war modern product design. These 100 product designs are displayed in 10 categories: Classic Japanese Design, Furniture & Housewares, Tableware & Cookware, Apparel & Accessories, Children, Stationery, Hobbies, Healthcare, Disaster Relief, and Transportation.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration
July 17, 2014
Construction is nearing midpoint at the downtown Berkeley site of the future home of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA). Workers will soon be erecting the last of the steel beams that form the frame of this dynamic building. To celebrate this important milestone, BAM/PFA invites its Bay Area friends and neighbors to a “topping out” ceremony on Addison Street, between Shattuck Avenue and Oxford Street.

39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show
August 8–10, 2014

The American Craft Council returns to San Francisco for its 39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show this August 8-10, 2014 at Fort Mason Center. As the largest juried fine craft show on the West Coast, the 2014 San Francisco Show is expected to draw more than 12,000 fine craft collectors and design enthusiasts.

Conversations in Place 2014
August 10, 2014
ow in its third year, Conversations in Place 2014 begins another series of illuminating explorations of “Southern California – Yesterday and Tomorrow” at the historic Rancho Los Alamitos. The 4-part series begins Sunday, August 10 and continues through Sunday, November 2. The series begins with W. Richard West, Jr, President and CEO of The Autry National Center of the American West, Milford Wayne Donaldson, FAIA, chairman of the United States Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Pamela Seager, Executive Director of Rancho Los Alamitos, and Architect Stephen Farneth, FAIA, founding partner of the award-winning historic preservation firm Architectural Resources Group, in conversation about the place of museums and historic sites in shaping the story of Southern California. Can these institutions escape the straightjacket of the time to better interpret history to the 21st century?

NOW AND NEXT 2014 Symposium on Technology for Design and Construction
August 13–15, 2014
Meet thought leaders and colleagues interested in architecture, engineering, construction, open BIM Exchange, software trends and more. Learn about the innovations that are moving companies and people forward
including: where and how design and delivery is shifting; which software applications are transformative; best practices for collaborative project delivery; how to engage with the global BIM community. Connect with and hear from the best and the brightest such as Jordan Brandt, AutoDesk; Deke Smith, buildingSMART alliance; Ray Topping, Fiatech; Bill East, Prairie  Sky Consulting (formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers).

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

Competitions

Deadline: August 18
Fabric
Formabilio


Deadline: September 2
Hansgrohe+Axor Das Design Competition
Hansgrohe+Axor


Deadline: September 5

2014 Designer Dream Bath Competition
Duravit

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

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Industry Partners

  

  




















 

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Tuesday
Apr092013

Looking Back: Talking Office Design with Clive Wilkinson

One of Clive Wilkinson's inventive, progressive work environments at Macquarie Group Limited, One Shelley Street, Sydney, Australia. Courtesy of Clive Wilkinson Architects.Given that we spend big chunks of our waking hours at work or working, it stands to reason that the way our work environments look and function should be a high priority. At FORM, we’ve been exploring our working life and the changing shape and look of the modern workplace. Today, we’re sharing an interview with Culver City—based architect Clive Wilkinson, first published in our September/October 2011 issue. Here, Wilkinson— just elevated to an AIA fellow last week—discusses his own designs for office space and the broader philosophical realities inherent in the projects.

Check back here throughout the year, as we explore the topic in more detail.

1. What are the most important elements in designing an office?

We believe there are two overriding issues, and they are not design ones. The first must address the personal needs of someone working in an office, and the second addresses the social nature of that environment. We believe that small businesses are relatively simple challenges as they can work like extended families, where people have a sense of (partial) ownership of the business. However, large corporations suffer from scale challenges and people engagement problems. Our goal is to encourage a sense of employee engagement and ownership.

2. You draw a lot of parallels between designing workplaces and designing educational facilities. What can the two learn from one another?

We believe that working and learning should be almost identical activities. The companies that will thrive in the future already know this. A successful business must foster a learning/growing culture, and a successful school must adopt a serious work culture as a means of penetrating future challenges.

3. How do you address the needs of individual work and collaborative work?

Although there are many great examples of good work environments, there are still some dogmas surrounding “the office.” Data from Cisco and others has shown that while 70% of office space is configured for personal work, and 30% collaborative, the ratio should be reversed. The office of the future will be shaped for collaboration in all its various forms.

4. What is the biggest mistake made in office design?

The biggest mistake by far is what Marshall McLuhan described as “continuing to use old tools to solve new problems.” Cubicles are still selling in the marketplace even though these “tools” are divisive and hopeless from both a personal and collaboration perspective. The cubicle is not a solution; it is a sociological problem.

5. A lot of your projects feature bright colors and playful elements. How does this help create a productive environment?

The most valuable kind of work today has been called “serious play.” There needs to be a thread of disruption in the corporate environment, which mirrors creative thinking. Color and playful elements are part of that. This also reflects Disruption Theory concepts, which many organizations now value as a powerful methodology for driving change.

6. Many of your projects have very open floor plans. Does noise become a problem?

Openness is one of the most important factors in the modern office, for numerous reasons, but the most powerful one is organizational transparency. When we designed Google’s headquarters some years ago, we planned around distinct noise contours so that there could be buzz in the public spaces and quiet in the concentrated work areas. A simple mitigation solution is often to pad the ceiling, but also to strategically

7. How has technology in the workplace impacted the architecture of the workplace?

New IT technology is beginning to radically liberate work. With mobile devices, the worker can work anywhere. In addition, we are seeing the end of paper. Our building in Sydney for Macquarie Bank had no garbage bins for workers, and we are now talking to clients about not wiring their offices, but relying on wireless with mobile VC devices.

 

8. What has been the biggest lesson you’ve learned from designing these environments?

 

Ultimately, the biggest lesson we’ve learned has been that simple formulaic solutions are generally weak, and that complexity requires complex responses.

 

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