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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Wednesday
May012013

On the Boards: HGA's Holistic Approach to Sustainability

HGA's Design for East Los Angeles College's Student Success Center embraces a broad view of sustainability. Image courtesy HGA.

Sustainability is in the DNA at HGA Architects and Engineers. Just recently the firm took two awards—Excellence in Social Responsibility and Excellence in Stewardship of the Natural Environment—in the 2013 Sustainable Quality Awards program sponsored by the Santa Monica Chamber of Commerce, Sustainable Works and Sustainable Santa Monica/City of Santa Monica’s Office of Sustainability and the Environment. For the firm, though, sustainability means more than just designing projects incorporating recycled materials or featuring renewable energy technologies.

“We’ve always used it more holistically,” says Satoshi Teshima, the project designer of the Student Success Center at East Los Angeles College, one of the firm’s newest endeavors and a prime example of HGA’s commitment to and expansive view of sustainability. “It’s all about the human experience.” For the 130,000-square-foot building, slated to open next year, HGA is creating a space for students that nurtures their learning and facilitates their transition into the real world.

Drawing from their work designing healthcare and office spaces, the HGA team came up with an innovative approach to the classroom, which emphasizes collaboration and non-traditional layouts. Instead of a fixed set-up, with a professor lecturing at the front of the room, says Teshima, “We’ll have moveable lecterns and furniture. You won’t be able to tell where the front is. They can change the learning environment in a matter of 15 seconds.” The reimagined classrooms will foster engagement between instructors and students and among the students themselves.

Even the exits will promote connections. “The typical classroom building has a corridor in middle and classrooms on either,” Teshima explains. “When 40 people enter or leave, the conversation stops at the door, because you’re confined to a little corridor. Our design allows a lot of spill out space in front of classroom and lets groups leave together so conversations can continue.” Other spaces throughout the building will also provide for plenty of informal gathering areas to create learning moments beyond the classroom.

Perhaps most importantly, the building will be flooded with light, something that has been shown to substantially improve students’ learning outcomes. “The program sits around the perimeter, and there’s a large open atrium,” Teshima says. “It allows for a much brighter learning environment.” Ultimately, Teshima sees the environment HGA is creating as a critical to the future success of ELAC’s students. “Our design is key to supporting new learning modalities,” he notes.

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