LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Update: Checking in on Alta Verde Escena | Main | The FORM Questionnaire: A Conversation with Brooks Atwood »
Monday
May132013

The Rebranding of Urban Transit: A "TOD Summit" Lets Architects Rethink Rail

By Jack Skelley

Architects and urban planners agree: TODs—or Transit Oriented Developments—are the future of our cities. As land on the urban fringes is consumed by sprawl, creating hideous commutes and sour economies, a crucial solution is to bring transportation close to jobs and housing. What is also dawning on these experts, however, is that the TOD solution is not the most people-friendly concept. Fairly or not, it tends to connote noisy trains and cramped living.

James C. Auld, AIA, a partner with Altoon Partners LLP, is an architect leading the rethinking of TODs. He co-chairs the annual TOD Summit produced by ULI Los Angeles. (This year’s TOD summit is Thursday, June 6, at Metro Headquarters in downtown Los Angeles. Register here.) He describes how the TOD solution is evolving into “great places to live and play.”

Form: What is wrong with the term TOD?

Auld: For people in the military, government and non-profits, it’s a tidy and memorable moniker. But as we enter an entirely new phase, it’s really inadequate to describe what could and will be going on. TOD is pretty threatening, except when you realize what it can give to you. It has been associated with higher density, shoe-horning more people into apartment buildings and “workforce/subsidized/senior housing.”

However, “transit orientation” does give working people added or better-appropriated time in their lives. So it should be presented as improving people’s quality of life, giving them options for when the car doesn’t work, for when you get older, for those times when driving four miles can take 35 minutes.

Form: On a design level, what do TODs do for neighborhoods?

Auld: When you walk from where you live to a rail or transit station, everything slows down. That zone between the curb and 15 feet up becomes much more tactile and every linear foot is more valuable, both as walking experience and as real estate. It’s about frontage versus square feet. When you’re in a car the streetscape is mostly a blur. 

Form: What design changes will make that experience more livable and enjoyable?

Auld: It’s about connecting transit systems where people live, work, play – where they have to be and want to be. I am a digital person. But younger people especially live in the world of smartphone apps. In Seattle and Portland, where transportation is highly advanced, the travel app is really useful and sophisticated. Meanwhile, the L.A. subway doesn’t even have Wi-Fi. You are disconnected when you are underground. Younger people are all over this. The car is not going away, but people are choosing to live in more urban places. Many of them are live/work places and smaller-scale development. The best ones also have serious bike facilities. All this will meet the needs of younger people and market demands. There is a huge demographic swing happening, and the future results will be amazing.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>