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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Thursday
May162013

Book Review: From Art to Architecture

By Michael Webb

Diller Scofidio + Renfro: Architecture After Images. Edward Dimendberg. (The University of Chicago Press, $65).

A timely and penetrating study of a firm that has surged to prominence on the strength of two headline projects in New York: its imaginative transformation of Lincoln Center and the High Line (in association with Field Operations). In both, the architects were highly respectful of existing structures and that augers well for an even greater challenge: extending the Museum of Modern Art without destroying the American Museum of Folk Art. MoMA outraged the architectural establishment by threatening to demolish its next-door neighbor. It will require all of DS+R’s skill to integrate Tod Williams & Billie Tsien’s unique building into the new structure, and convince an overbearing institution to reconsider its threatened act of vandalism.

Established in 1979 by Ricardo Scofidio and Elizabeth Diller, the practice created a succession of playful, subversive art works and installations, which culminated in Blur—a cloud of water vapor hovering over a lake—a major draw for the 2002 Swiss National Exhibition. An innovative apartment block in Japan went largely unnoticed, and their daring design for the Eyebeam Museum in Chelsea was dropped after 9/11.  Not until 2006, with the Institute of Contemporary Art on the Boston waterfront, did they win widespread acclaim.

Edward Dimendberg, a professor of film at UC Irvine, has been tracking DS+R for nine years and he provides an enlightening chronicle of their varied projects and ideas. He quotes historian Siegfried Giedion who wrote, in 1928, that “only film can make the new architecture intelligible.” That’s a questionable assertion: you have to experience a building with all your senses to appreciate its quality--still and moving images can offer no more than a simulacrum. Beguiling as photos of Blur undoubtedly were, they paled beside the experience of walking through that cloud and feeling its wetness.

Dimendberg occasionally lapses into the academic jargon of media studies. “If Diller and Scofidio had early on recognized the utility of the semiological logic of binary oppositions between signifiers and signifieds, the components of the sign for Saussure, they never became enslaved to this model.” Architecture jargon can be just as obfuscatory, but it both cases it’s unnecessary, and these foggy passages are mercifully brief. Dimendberg likens their art pieces to those of Duchamp and Matta-Clark, and he explores their influence as radical teachers at Cooper Union and Princeton. As practitioners and teachers, Diller and Scofidio questioned the premises and assumptions that guide most architects, and in doing so laid the foundation for their later large-scale projects.

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