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Events

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Japanese Design Today 100
June 27–July 19, 2014
The Japan Foundation presents the World premiere of the exhibition Japanese Design Today 100, which opens at UCLA’s Department of Architecture & Urban Design at Perloff Hall. This exhibition showcases the Designscape of contemporary Japan through 100 objects of Japanese design: 89 objects created since 2010 that are well known in Japan, as well as 11 objects that represent the origin of Japanese post-war modern product design. These 100 product designs are displayed in 10 categories: Classic Japanese Design, Furniture & Housewares, Tableware & Cookware, Apparel & Accessories, Children, Stationery, Hobbies, Healthcare, Disaster Relief, and Transportation.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration
July 17, 2014
Construction is nearing midpoint at the downtown Berkeley site of the future home of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA). Workers will soon be erecting the last of the steel beams that form the frame of this dynamic building. To celebrate this important milestone, BAM/PFA invites its Bay Area friends and neighbors to a “topping out” ceremony on Addison Street, between Shattuck Avenue and Oxford Street.

39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show
August 8–10, 2014

The American Craft Council returns to San Francisco for its 39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show this August 8-10, 2014 at Fort Mason Center. As the largest juried fine craft show on the West Coast, the 2014 San Francisco Show is expected to draw more than 12,000 fine craft collectors and design enthusiasts.

Conversations in Place 2014
August 10, 2014
ow in its third year, Conversations in Place 2014 begins another series of illuminating explorations of “Southern California – Yesterday and Tomorrow” at the historic Rancho Los Alamitos. The 4-part series begins Sunday, August 10 and continues through Sunday, November 2. The series begins with W. Richard West, Jr, President and CEO of The Autry National Center of the American West, Milford Wayne Donaldson, FAIA, chairman of the United States Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Pamela Seager, Executive Director of Rancho Los Alamitos, and Architect Stephen Farneth, FAIA, founding partner of the award-winning historic preservation firm Architectural Resources Group, in conversation about the place of museums and historic sites in shaping the story of Southern California. Can these institutions escape the straightjacket of the time to better interpret history to the 21st century?

NOW AND NEXT 2014 Symposium on Technology for Design and Construction
August 13–15, 2014
Meet thought leaders and colleagues interested in architecture, engineering, construction, open BIM Exchange, software trends and more. Learn about the innovations that are moving companies and people forward
including: where and how design and delivery is shifting; which software applications are transformative; best practices for collaborative project delivery; how to engage with the global BIM community. Connect with and hear from the best and the brightest such as Jordan Brandt, AutoDesk; Deke Smith, buildingSMART alliance; Ray Topping, Fiatech; Bill East, Prairie  Sky Consulting (formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers).

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

Competitions

Deadline: August 18
Fabric
Formabilio


Deadline: September 2
Hansgrohe+Axor Das Design Competition
Hansgrohe+Axor


Deadline: September 5

2014 Designer Dream Bath Competition
Duravit

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Education: Public Interest Design Portland | Main | Showroom: How We Sit Now »
Monday
Jun172013

Case Study: Lee Brennan on Healthcare Innovation

The linear accelerator at The Doug + Nancy Barnhart Cancer Center at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center overlooks a garden, one of many innovative, patient-focused design decisions Lee Brennan and Cuningham Group incorporated into the facility's design. Image courtesy Cuningham Group. It seems like the simplest of ideas—improve the hospital experience for patients (and by extension their caregivers and loved ones) and create a constellation of favorable circumstances that can promote healing and reduce the stress and anxiety levels of all comers. As a brief look at modern medicine reveals, the reality has been very different. In his work at Cuningham Group’s healthcare studio, principal Lee Brennan has been thinking long and hard about just how to improve those experiences and, by extension, potentially improve outcomes.

A case in point is Brennan and the San Diego team’s recent work on The Doug + Nancy Barnhart Cancer Center at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center in San Diego, where, Brennan says, “every measure was taken to improve the patient experience from the moment of arrival.” To do this, Wayne Hunter and Phillip Soule, of Cuningham Group, led groups of facility leadership and healthcare professionals in intensive, collaborative work sessions to provide feedback on what they liked—and disliked—about the existing facility. On other projects Brennan noted they have used a patient advisory group. These methods allow them to incorporate that feedback. The result is state-of-the-art facilities that keeps the human factor in sight.

At the center, gardens and fountains appear throughout, even in the linear accelerator vault, “where the patient faces a floor-to-ceiling wall of windows that provide daylight and open directly on to a view of an outside garden,” notes Brennan. “The machine itself was turned 180 degrees from its typical orientation to hide the gantry, enabling it to serve rather than intimidate the patient.” Entrances too are designed to be residential-scale and unintimidating; returning patients also have their own more, private entrance. Other innovations include an entire floor outfitted with an air purification system allowing patients facing long hospital stays a chance at a more normal existence. 

Though Brennan’s focus is squarely on the patient, he says, “Too often medical designers get caught up pleasing the patient, who is essentially the customer. But staff is there every day. So we create what we call 'offstage' spaces where they can get access to natural light: We cut courtyards into the lockers and lounge areas and even bring daylighting into the surgical corridors when possible.”

Improving the experiences of patients and staff may just be the tip of the iceberg when comes to rethinking the healthcare experience more generally—something Brennan and Cuningham Group, recently joined by NTD Healthcare in a strategic expansion, are primed to do. For Brennan, the creation of wellness districts could improve the quality of life for the community as a whole. As he sees it, rather than creating multi-hospital districts in urban areas (think Boston, for example), Brennan sees the promise of areas that broadly promote health and well being for patients, potential patients and staff alike. It would mean developing close-by, affordable housing for staff, enticing grocery stores and restaurants into the area, building athletic facilities and other facilities that get people moving. “The hospital can be instigator of change,” says Brennan. “It’s an idea that can be taken anywhere, even rural areas with a bit of a modification—you don't need five giant hospitals, just an anchor tenant in a larger conversation.” 

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