LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

RICS Development Series Los Angeles 2014: Wilshire Grand Center
November 20, 2014
Join RICS Southern California chapter for the launch of their Los Angeles Development Series seminar, which takes an in-depth look at the development and construction of the upscale, world-class Wilshire Grand Project in downtown LA.

Innovation and Design Excellence in Healthcare Facilities Design: Today and Tomorrow
November 21, 2014
Hosted by AIA Los Angeles and AIA San Francisco, Future Care: Design for Health is a one-day healthcare symposium featuring the top minds in healthcare planning, design and construction. Speakers will address the rapidly changing healthcare environment and how these changes impact what healthcare providers need from the design and construction community.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Building Your Business: An Ownership Transition Case Study, Part 2 | Main | Showroom: Math Meets Art »
Monday
Jun242013

Building Your Business: An Ownership Transition Case Study, Part 1

Now under construction, an adaptive re-use project by Nadel Architects, will house offices. Courtesy Nadel Architects.You’ve grown your business from scratch, seen success, but what now? For solo practitioners, it’s a nagging question. Whether or not you’re close to retirement, what happens to your firm? Does it disappear? How does it carry on without you? Today we begin explore ownership transitions and one firm’s experience. We start with a conversation with its founder; the second part will focus on the new team in place and their plans for the firm’s next chapter. 

Nadel Architects’ creation story starts out as so many often do: A talented young person starts a company out of a house. In this case, the year is 1973, and the house is just outside Los Angeles. Through hard work, patience and skill, the founder, Herb Nadel, expands the business, transforming it into a highly regarded practice with a robust portfolio of local and international projects—everything from stadiums in China to hotels in Los Angeles and Chicago.

Early on, recalls Nadel, “I looked for a partner—I was young and scared to death—but could never find anyone I felt comfortable with.” As a result, the ensuing successes, the failures, the nuts and bolts of running a business all fell on Nadel’s shoulders. About seven years ago he began thinking about the future in earnest, both his and the firm’s. “I’d seen firms become unglued after the principal left,” Nadel explains, and he wanted to avoid the same fate. “They’d either die or evaporate. It’s a shame, and I didn’t want our marvelous portfolio and great reputation to disappear.”

Nadel turned to Bill Mandel, a San Francisco–based attorney who specializes in ownership transitions for architecture, engineering and design firms, and began exploring ways to preserve Nadel Architects. All was going according to plan when the downturn came. The firm, like so many others in the industry, took a hit. Nadel put his transition plans on the back burner as the company’s immediate future became the focus. “We essentially re-engineered ourselves,” Nadel now says of that time.

With the economy improving, Nadel again began planning for a transition—one that would offer ownership stakes to senior members of his staff. “We have marvelous people,” he says of the first group of new owners. “I selected them because they emerged as remarkably skilled in each area of expertise, and they balance each other.” In turn, when those new owners turn 65, they’ll begin selling their own stakes to a new generation. It’s a way of ensuring continuity and infusing the firm with fresh creative spirit and energy.

Even with the new ownership structure now firmly in place, Nadel doesn’t see himself leaving anytime soon. “I’m a feisty character,” he explains. “I expect to be around for a long time.”

Stay tuned for part two of our look at Nadel Architects, when we’ll hear from two of the firm’s new owners, Patrick Winters and Greg Lyon.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>