LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

A Partnership of AIA Los Angeles and USC Architecture: BIM EDGE + BIM GAP
August 22–23, 2014
BIM GAP will feature presentations about the bridging GAPs between BIM tools (analysis, construction, facilities management, and more) and also bridging the GAPs between BIM people (contractors, architects, owners, managers, subs, consultants). Learn how professionals are dealing with these gaps towards realizing the full potential of BIM. Who do you call when you need BIM guidance? EDGE examines potential partners in working with BIM beyond your firm’s current capabilities: BIM coordinators, consultants, modeling services, others.

Architecture and the City Festival
September 1–30, 2014
The American Institute of Architects, San Francisco chapter (AIA San Francisco) and the Center for Architecture + Design announce the 11th annual Architecture and the City festival, the nation’s largest architectural festival of its kind. Taking place in San Francisco every September, the month-long celebration features behind the scenes and walking tours, films, exhibitions, lectures and more, providing opportunities for participants to engage with the local architecture community and experience design in a myriad of ways throughout the city. The 2014 Architecture and the City festival theme, Home: My San Francisco, will examine the shifting nature of home, the different elements that contribute to its definition, and its relation to the urban fabric. Over 40 festival programs will explore the cultural richness and diversity of our local architectural and design community as well as provide a platform for conversation about our changing landscape and its implications for a city in a time of rapidly intensifying housing needs.

San Francisco Living: Home Tours
September 20–21, 2014
AIA San Francisco and the Center for Architecture + Design are excited to announce the 12th annual San Francisco Living: Home Tours, a two-day open house event featuring a select number of modern residences. The popular weekend showcases a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods and residences, including single-family homes, contemporary renovations and multi-family residences, and is the first tour series in the Bay Area to promote residential design from the architect's point of view. Throughout the weekend, tour participants can see some of the city's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover innovative design solutions that inspire unique San Francisco living.

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: August 18
Fabric
Formabilio


Deadline: September 2
Hansgrohe+Axor Das Design Competition
Hansgrohe+Axor


Deadline: September 5

2014 Designer Dream Bath Competition
Duravit

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Building Your Business: An Ownership Transition Case Study, Part 2 | Main | Showroom: Math Meets Art »
Monday
Jun242013

Building Your Business: An Ownership Transition Case Study, Part 1

Now under construction, an adaptive re-use project by Nadel Architects, will house offices. Courtesy Nadel Architects.You’ve grown your business from scratch, seen success, but what now? For solo practitioners, it’s a nagging question. Whether or not you’re close to retirement, what happens to your firm? Does it disappear? How does it carry on without you? Today we begin explore ownership transitions and one firm’s experience. We start with a conversation with its founder; the second part will focus on the new team in place and their plans for the firm’s next chapter. 

Nadel Architects’ creation story starts out as so many often do: A talented young person starts a company out of a house. In this case, the year is 1973, and the house is just outside Los Angeles. Through hard work, patience and skill, the founder, Herb Nadel, expands the business, transforming it into a highly regarded practice with a robust portfolio of local and international projects—everything from stadiums in China to hotels in Los Angeles and Chicago.

Early on, recalls Nadel, “I looked for a partner—I was young and scared to death—but could never find anyone I felt comfortable with.” As a result, the ensuing successes, the failures, the nuts and bolts of running a business all fell on Nadel’s shoulders. About seven years ago he began thinking about the future in earnest, both his and the firm’s. “I’d seen firms become unglued after the principal left,” Nadel explains, and he wanted to avoid the same fate. “They’d either die or evaporate. It’s a shame, and I didn’t want our marvelous portfolio and great reputation to disappear.”

Nadel turned to Bill Mandel, a San Francisco–based attorney who specializes in ownership transitions for architecture, engineering and design firms, and began exploring ways to preserve Nadel Architects. All was going according to plan when the downturn came. The firm, like so many others in the industry, took a hit. Nadel put his transition plans on the back burner as the company’s immediate future became the focus. “We essentially re-engineered ourselves,” Nadel now says of that time.

With the economy improving, Nadel again began planning for a transition—one that would offer ownership stakes to senior members of his staff. “We have marvelous people,” he says of the first group of new owners. “I selected them because they emerged as remarkably skilled in each area of expertise, and they balance each other.” In turn, when those new owners turn 65, they’ll begin selling their own stakes to a new generation. It’s a way of ensuring continuity and infusing the firm with fresh creative spirit and energy.

Even with the new ownership structure now firmly in place, Nadel doesn’t see himself leaving anytime soon. “I’m a feisty character,” he explains. “I expect to be around for a long time.”

Stay tuned for part two of our look at Nadel Architects, when we’ll hear from two of the firm’s new owners, Patrick Winters and Greg Lyon.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>