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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

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Deadline: January 16
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Thursday
Jul252013

Urban Design: Swinging Low in Hull 

The Scale Lane Bridge in the English city of Hull is part walkway, part experience, featuring span that gives passengers a ride while allowing river traffic to pass. Photograph © Timothy Soar.

The River Hull has been the lifeblood of the English city of the same name for centuries, with vessels ferrying goods along the waterway during the the country's industrial glory days. Now, the river has a new riparian jewel: the Scale Lane Bridge, designed by the architecture firm of McDowell+Benedetti, in collaboration with Alan Baxter Associates and Qualter Hall, it was the winning entry in a competition held in 2005.

Located on a former industrial site, the new structure serves as a pedestrian walkway, linking the west bank’s Museum Quarter to The Deep, the city’s aquarium (and an architectural gem in its own right). Its gently sweeping curved form provides two walkways, divided by a central spine. The spine itself provides opportunities for seating and terminates, at one end, in an observation platform with seating for walkers to pause and take in panoramic views of the river- and landscapes.

As architect Jonathan McDowell explains, "The bridge creates a unique and memorable new place for the city where people can enjoy the experience of being on the river.”

Beyond its appealing design, McDowell points out perhaps the bridge's most compelling quality: “It creates a special event—the world's first bridge (probably) that people can ride on while it is moving.” He and his team designed the bridge to rotate, opening up to river traffic as needed via an electrical drive mechanism and turns slowly enough that passengers can safely board the bridge from the west side. And while it’s opening, a sequence of bells, a sonic landscape designed by artist Nayan Kulkarni, provides accompaniment.

For pedestrians, the new bridge is a pleasure. For designers and urban planners looking to connect the land and water, it offers an innovative template. 

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