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2014 AIA|LA 2x8: EVOLVE Student Exhibition
April 11, 2014
2x8 is an annual exhibition sponsored by the AIA|LA, showcasing exemplary student work from architecture and design institutions throughout California. Each of the participating academic programs selects two projects that exemplify its core vision. The students’ design work will be judged by a noteworthy panel of architects and designers who will then announce the winners at the exhibition opening and convene in a forum to discuss the award-winning work. 

RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014
May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums. 

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.


Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century. 

 

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Deadline: April 11 
BFI Fuller Challenge 
Buckminster Fuller Institute 

Deadline: April 25
Call for Entries (Student Awards) 
ASLA 

Deadline: June 1 
AIA|LA 2014 Design Awards Program Registration 
AIA|LA

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Workbook: Cuba Meets Mexico at Taqueria Nacional

Cuban design and Mexican cuisine meet at DC's Taqueria Nacional, a project designed by Streetsense. Image courtesy Streetsense. When John Fulchino, the co-owner of Taqueria Nacional in Washington, DC, first met with Kristina Crenshaw and the design team at Streetsense, he came bearing a book filled with photos of Cuba. It served as the jumping off point for the restaurant, which was moving to larger digs in a former post office building. 

“He said, ‘This is what I want and that was the genesis of what we did,’” says Crenshaw. “The door leading into the kitchen was taken directly from the book. The colors we chose were found throughout the book. Event the idea of the different types of rooms—we took those and used them to break up the space so it wouldn't feel like a bowling alley.”

In practice, it means that there’s an outdoor courtyard at the front with a polished concrete floor and walls that look like distressed stucco. (The finishes were done by a local artist, Eric Albrecht, who created a mural along in addition to the decorative wall treatments.) There, Crenshaw and her team also decided to embrace the electrical room, concealing it behind corrugated metal siding, which happened to be reclaimed. A bit rusty and covered with nail holes, the contractor was taken aback when he saw them and immediately placed a call to Crenshaw. “We assured him that’s what we wanted,” she says.

The center space was inspired by images of living rooms, so it’s homier with a beam ceiling and framed mirrors lining the walls. The rear space, with the kitchen, takes its cues from the kitchens found in the book. But, in a nod to its postal past, a panel on the service counter reminds customers that this used to be the T Street Station. The garbage cans throughout were custom-made to recall old mailboxes since the postal service doesn't sell retired ones.

If the furnishings, particularly the seating, seems like it came from your grandmother’s basement, that’s because they did, after a fashion. “We gave him direction, and he found things at yard sales,” Crenshaw says of Fulchino’s sourcing efforts. The fountain in the kitchen area was another of his finds. The result is a fun mix of shapes and sizes and textures—concrete, wood, metal and vinyl among them— that lend a casual yet collected feel to the space.

“This was a collaboration between us and our client,” says Crenshaw. “We got his ideas out of his head and on paper.”


 

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