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2014 AIA|LA 2x8: EVOLVE Student Exhibition
April 11, 2014
2x8 is an annual exhibition sponsored by the AIA|LA, showcasing exemplary student work from architecture and design institutions throughout California. Each of the participating academic programs selects two projects that exemplify its core vision. The students’ design work will be judged by a noteworthy panel of architects and designers who will then announce the winners at the exhibition opening and convene in a forum to discuss the award-winning work. 

RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014
May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums. 

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.


Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century. 

 

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Deadline: April 25
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Deadline: June 1 
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Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
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Hidden
« Elements: Material Matters | Main | Showroom: Sitting Pretty Outside »
Thursday
Aug292013

Exhibition Design: Clive Wilkinson Talks Never Built

Architect Clive Wilkinson talks to us about the ideas behind his design for the A+D Museum's Never Built: Los Angeles show. Image courtesy A+D Museum.“Our concern was how to tell the story of so many different artifacts,” Clive Wilkinson, the president and design director of his eponymous architecture firm, says of the driving idea behind the design of the Never Built: Los Angeles exhibition, on view now through October 13 at the A+D Museum. New to the exhibition-design game, Wilkinson, who worked with Jenny Myers, Mathew Moran and many others, initially drew on his retail-design experience to underpin his concept for the space.

“What’s unique about retail is that it’s often a limited experience of only one room,” he says. “The emphasis on how you use the space and map information to enhance the user experience. When a show’s well-designed, it’s like good retail design in a sense—but you’re communicating a product that’s more interesting than retail.”

The plan called for opening up the space of the museum (he and his team avoided building walls). Two existing columns were wrapped with tower elements, effectively taking them out of the spatial equation. To preserve light-sensitive exhibition materials, “we closed off the storefront,” says Wilkinson. “It turned into an advantage, so the experience didn’t leach out on to the street and made it more of a cohesive experience.” The floor features a 1938 map of the city “to locate everything geographically and emphasize the urban nature of these schemes,” he says. 

While the map was chosen in large part because of expediency—it was difficult to get ahold of a high-enough resolution map of the city—it proved serendipitous. “It was the chronological midpoint of the show, and the map of the city as it was known to the people coming up with these ideas,” says Wilkinson. “The city was in transition, a set of towns coming together. If we’d used a map of the city today, it would be much more developed with no empty patches on the map. Permanent infrastructure would be there. That’s not the city that was the starting point of these ideas. Some of these projects were hugely naïve and optimistic and quite silly.”

As for the physical installation of the show, “there’s a lot of ambiguity around the artifacts,” notes Wilkinson. Details on sizes and shapes sometimes weren’t known until the last moments. “You have to have a lot of flexability about how you handle the artifacts,” he says. “We had to have casual and robust infrastructure so we could add 12 inches to a plinth. We realized this at the beginning and adopted it as the guiding principal.”

Beyond adding exhibition designer to his already jam-packed portfolio, his work on the show caused him to reflect on the state of architecture in general. “If you’re true to yourself,” he says, “the 1950s and 60s more fun period to be an architect. There was a greater appreciation for the new and modern.”

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