LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Elements: Material Matters | Main | Showroom: Sitting Pretty Outside »
Thursday
Aug292013

Exhibition Design: Clive Wilkinson Talks Never Built

Architect Clive Wilkinson talks to us about the ideas behind his design for the A+D Museum's Never Built: Los Angeles show. Image courtesy A+D Museum.“Our concern was how to tell the story of so many different artifacts,” Clive Wilkinson, the president and design director of his eponymous architecture firm, says of the driving idea behind the design of the Never Built: Los Angeles exhibition, on view now through October 13 at the A+D Museum. New to the exhibition-design game, Wilkinson, who worked with Jenny Myers, Mathew Moran and many others, initially drew on his retail-design experience to underpin his concept for the space.

“What’s unique about retail is that it’s often a limited experience of only one room,” he says. “The emphasis on how you use the space and map information to enhance the user experience. When a show’s well-designed, it’s like good retail design in a sense—but you’re communicating a product that’s more interesting than retail.”

The plan called for opening up the space of the museum (he and his team avoided building walls). Two existing columns were wrapped with tower elements, effectively taking them out of the spatial equation. To preserve light-sensitive exhibition materials, “we closed off the storefront,” says Wilkinson. “It turned into an advantage, so the experience didn’t leach out on to the street and made it more of a cohesive experience.” The floor features a 1938 map of the city “to locate everything geographically and emphasize the urban nature of these schemes,” he says. 

While the map was chosen in large part because of expediency—it was difficult to get ahold of a high-enough resolution map of the city—it proved serendipitous. “It was the chronological midpoint of the show, and the map of the city as it was known to the people coming up with these ideas,” says Wilkinson. “The city was in transition, a set of towns coming together. If we’d used a map of the city today, it would be much more developed with no empty patches on the map. Permanent infrastructure would be there. That’s not the city that was the starting point of these ideas. Some of these projects were hugely naïve and optimistic and quite silly.”

As for the physical installation of the show, “there’s a lot of ambiguity around the artifacts,” notes Wilkinson. Details on sizes and shapes sometimes weren’t known until the last moments. “You have to have a lot of flexability about how you handle the artifacts,” he says. “We had to have casual and robust infrastructure so we could add 12 inches to a plinth. We realized this at the beginning and adopted it as the guiding principal.”

Beyond adding exhibition designer to his already jam-packed portfolio, his work on the show caused him to reflect on the state of architecture in general. “If you’re true to yourself,” he says, “the 1950s and 60s more fun period to be an architect. There was a greater appreciation for the new and modern.”

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>