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Events

Architecture and the City Festival
September 1–30, 2014
The American Institute of Architects, San Francisco chapter (AIA San Francisco) and the Center for Architecture + Design announce the 11th annual Architecture and the City festival, the nation’s largest architectural festival of its kind. Taking place in San Francisco every September, the month-long celebration features behind the scenes and walking tours, films, exhibitions, lectures and more, providing opportunities for participants to engage with the local architecture community and experience design in a myriad of ways throughout the city. The 2014 Architecture and the City festival theme, Home: My San Francisco, will examine the shifting nature of home, the different elements that contribute to its definition, and its relation to the urban fabric. Over 40 festival programs will explore the cultural richness and diversity of our local architectural and design community as well as provide a platform for conversation about our changing landscape and its implications for a city in a time of rapidly intensifying housing needs.

Gearing Up for Better, Healthier, and More Efficient Homes
September 19, 2014
The USGBC will present, Gearing Up for Better, Healthier, and More Efficient Homes, at the upcoming AltCar Expo on Friday, September 19th at 9:30am.   Designed for building & design professionals, the lecture addresses the need to erect higher performing buildings and the push towards zero net energy buildings. Panelists include:  Tim Kohut, AIA Architect, Green Dinosaur; Lena Ashby Senior Sustainability Coordinator, Green Dinosaur; and Joel Cesare, Sustainable Building Advisor, City of Santa Monica.

10th Annual KAYAK and SUP Coastal Cleanup Day Event
September 20, 2014
On Saturday, September 20, from 8:15am–1:30pm, The Bay Foundation (TBF) will host its 10th Annual Marina del Rey Kayak Cleanup Day Event as part of the greater annual Coastal Cleanup Day (CCD) which draws over 14,000 volunteers from across Los Angeles County to hundreds of events. As the longest-running kayak and SUP cleanup site, the TBF event is immensely popular each year and spaces fill up early.

San Francisco Living: Home Tours
September 20–21, 2014
AIA San Francisco and the Center for Architecture + Design are excited to announce the 12th annual San Francisco Living: Home Tours, a two-day open house event featuring a select number of modern residences. The popular weekend showcases a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods and residences, including single-family homes, contemporary renovations and multi-family residences, and is the first tour series in the Bay Area to promote residential design from the architect's point of view. Throughout the weekend, tour participants can see some of the city's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover innovative design solutions that inspire unique San Francisco living.

Detroit Design Festival
September 23–28, 2014
Presented by the Detroit Creative Corridor Center (DC3), and supported by the Knight Foundation, the fourth-annual Detroit Design Festival spans all design disciplines and brings together commerce, culture, education, and entertainment with a full, varied program of exhibitions, openings, installations, shows, talks, open studios, fashion shows, product previews, performances and workshops.

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

Westedge Design Fair
October 16–19, 2014
The curated fair features over 150 leading and emerging, domestic and international furnishings brands. Catering to both trade and consumers, the event offers a complete experience for attendees, including panel discussions and workshops, culinary activities, custom installations, and a series of special events.

4th Annual Found L.A.
October 19, 2014
On Sunday, October 19, 2014, the non-profit L.A. Commons (www.lacommons.org) will host its 4th annual Found L.A: Festival of Neighborhoods, and its first based on a mayoral theme, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Great Streets Program. Angelenos will explore the main arteries of neighborhoods around the city, developed and not so, and meet the people in the center of activity there.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

 

 

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: October 31
Show Us Your Baldwin
Baldwin

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

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Tuesday
Sep102013

Book Review: A Fresh Look at Le Corbusier

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret). (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Urban plan for Rio de Janeiro. 1929. Aerial perspective with Guanabara Bay, the center and the beaches. Charcoal and pastel on paper. 29 15/16 x 31 11/16” (76 x 80.5 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLCBy Michael Webb

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes. Jean-Louis Cohen. MoMA, $75.

It’s ironic that MoMA presented one of the finest architectural exhibitions in years just as Barry Bergdoll, its widely admired curator of architecture, was stepping down, and its director was threatening to demolish the American Folk Art Museum—an architectural gem. Clearly, the gulf between the suits and the creatives yawns wide. If you missed the exhibition (and who wants to suffer New York in summer) you can catch it in Barcelona and Madrid next year. However, this companion book may prove more rewarding. A major reappraisal of a 20th-century master demands patient study of pictures, drawings and text, rather than abbreviated glimpses in a crowded gallery. From the seductive images of Richard Pare to the many essays that chart Corbu’s travels and his response to landscapes, this is a compelling, beautifully produced study that far outshines most books on the architect. 

In his introduction, Bergdoll speaks of “a profound relationship between practice and place in Le Corbusier’s life and work,” growing out of his explorations by land, sea and air. Midcentury planes flew low and slow, with many stops along the way, giving Corbu a bird’s-eye view of cities he wanted to re-plan and the topography that shaped his vision. “The notion of genius loci was crucial even to an iconoclast such as Le Corbusier,” wrote Caroline Constant. Think of the Villa Savoie rising from its meadow, the pilgrimage church of Ronchamp isolated on its hill (now marred by the gratuitous addition of Renzo Piano’s convent), and the monastery of La Tourette emerging from the land. Ribbon windows frame landscapes and draw them inside; towers on pilotis were intended to conserve the existing landscapes.

Corbu’s early buildings grew out of his love of the Mediterranean, from the ruined temples of Greece to the cubist white villages that stud the islands. He traveled widely as a young man, filling notebooks with sketches and impressions that informed his thinking about architecture, cities, and nature. Later voyages to South America and India stirred new feats of creativity. He embraced the world, from Tokyo to Moscow, Buenos Aires and Boston—even designing an unrealized sports complex for Baghdad. A fresh survey of his work was badly needed and no-one was better qualified to curate it than Jean-Louis Cohen, a leading historian of Modernism.

Cohen lays out the basic themes in his introduction and describes many of the buildings. Short essays by 28 other critics explore Corbu’s ideas and preoccupations. Together, they provide a vivid account of an architect struggling to be heeded and to build, fighting for projects that ranged from the visionary to the megalomaniacal. Maps chart his major trips and the shocking disparity between his meager output and the multitude of unrealized projects. We can give thanks that his reckless plans to rebuild Paris, Moscow and Algiers remained on paper, while regretting that he was denied the opportunity to build the League of Nations HQ, the Palace of the Soviets and a score of private commissions.

 

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