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RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014
May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums. 

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.


Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century. 

 

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Tuesday
Sep102013

Book Review: A Fresh Look at Le Corbusier

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret). (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Urban plan for Rio de Janeiro. 1929. Aerial perspective with Guanabara Bay, the center and the beaches. Charcoal and pastel on paper. 29 15/16 x 31 11/16” (76 x 80.5 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLCBy Michael Webb

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes. Jean-Louis Cohen. MoMA, $75.

It’s ironic that MoMA presented one of the finest architectural exhibitions in years just as Barry Bergdoll, its widely admired curator of architecture, was stepping down, and its director was threatening to demolish the American Folk Art Museum—an architectural gem. Clearly, the gulf between the suits and the creatives yawns wide. If you missed the exhibition (and who wants to suffer New York in summer) you can catch it in Barcelona and Madrid next year. However, this companion book may prove more rewarding. A major reappraisal of a 20th-century master demands patient study of pictures, drawings and text, rather than abbreviated glimpses in a crowded gallery. From the seductive images of Richard Pare to the many essays that chart Corbu’s travels and his response to landscapes, this is a compelling, beautifully produced study that far outshines most books on the architect. 

In his introduction, Bergdoll speaks of “a profound relationship between practice and place in Le Corbusier’s life and work,” growing out of his explorations by land, sea and air. Midcentury planes flew low and slow, with many stops along the way, giving Corbu a bird’s-eye view of cities he wanted to re-plan and the topography that shaped his vision. “The notion of genius loci was crucial even to an iconoclast such as Le Corbusier,” wrote Caroline Constant. Think of the Villa Savoie rising from its meadow, the pilgrimage church of Ronchamp isolated on its hill (now marred by the gratuitous addition of Renzo Piano’s convent), and the monastery of La Tourette emerging from the land. Ribbon windows frame landscapes and draw them inside; towers on pilotis were intended to conserve the existing landscapes.

Corbu’s early buildings grew out of his love of the Mediterranean, from the ruined temples of Greece to the cubist white villages that stud the islands. He traveled widely as a young man, filling notebooks with sketches and impressions that informed his thinking about architecture, cities, and nature. Later voyages to South America and India stirred new feats of creativity. He embraced the world, from Tokyo to Moscow, Buenos Aires and Boston—even designing an unrealized sports complex for Baghdad. A fresh survey of his work was badly needed and no-one was better qualified to curate it than Jean-Louis Cohen, a leading historian of Modernism.

Cohen lays out the basic themes in his introduction and describes many of the buildings. Short essays by 28 other critics explore Corbu’s ideas and preoccupations. Together, they provide a vivid account of an architect struggling to be heeded and to build, fighting for projects that ranged from the visionary to the megalomaniacal. Maps chart his major trips and the shocking disparity between his meager output and the multitude of unrealized projects. We can give thanks that his reckless plans to rebuild Paris, Moscow and Algiers remained on paper, while regretting that he was denied the opportunity to build the League of Nations HQ, the Palace of the Soviets and a score of private commissions.

 

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