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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Thursday
Jan162014

Book Review: Chilean Creativity

By Michael Webb

White Mountain: Architecture in Chile. Puro Chile and Hatje Cantz; DAP. $85  

All the usual suspects and several unfamiliar names are rounded up in this ambitious bilingual catalog of recent work by about sixty Chilean architects, working alone or on collaborative ventures.  Essays by Miquel Adriá,  Horacio Torrent, and Pablo Allard provide a historical background, explain how architecture has flourished in Chile over the past two decades, and introduce some of the leading players. Each architect or team is represented by one or more buildings—the prolific Mathias Klotz has eight—shown in plans and photos with brief factual descriptions.

All the significant new buildings I saw in Chile two years ago are included here, so this anthology revives happy memories of a country in which serious architecture has been widely embraced. Modernism rules. The remoteness of the country—a narrow strip, 4000 miles long that is isolated from the rest of the world by the Andes and the Pacific—bred a strong feeling of independence. Though rich in minerals, it contained no precious metals and was spared the cultural imperialism of Spain—and the dubious legacy of Colonial-style buildings. Chile was settled by European immigrants, but—in contrast to Argentina-- they had to work hard and contend with extremes of climate and devastating earthquakes. That shaped the architecture, which is for the most part, rigorous, restrained, and solidly constructed. Wood and concrete are widely employed. A few firms—notably Alejandro Aravena, Jose Cruz Ovalle, Sebastián Irarrazaval and Pezo von Ellrichshausen—have created work of great originality within these constraints.

If these names don’t trigger recognition, you can blame the shocking insularity of American media, and the widespread ignorance of cultural expression beyond our borders. Despite the influx  of immigrants from Latin America, the rest of our continent is still viewed through a clouded lens. That makes this book a valuable resource, but its production is seriously flawed. “We wanted an accessible and easy to read format,” declares the introduction. So why print texts in miniscule type on dark red paper? The English-language translations are often wooden and fail to highlight key aspects of the projects described. The pictures are of high quality but the credits are even tinier than the texts, and there are no dates. This is the revised edition of a collection first published in 2011; we can hope that the third will be radically improved.

 

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