LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter

 

 





Sponsors





Events 

Venice/Santa Monica Modern Home Tour
May 3, 2014

The Venice/Santa Monica Modern Home Tour gives L.A. residents a chance to explore and view some of the greatest examples of modern architecture right in their own area, via self-guided driving tour. Attendees learn from homeowners what it's like to live in a modern home and find out where the architects got their inspiration - directly from the architects themselves. The tour is self-guided and self-driven, allowing guests to explore these modern treasures at their own pace.

RICSSummit of the Americas Toronto 2014

May 4-6, 2014
RICS Summit of the Americas 2014 is for any real estate professional looking to draw from timely, in-depth market knowledge that will be shared by local and international experts in the land, property and construction sectors. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity to connect with top professionals from around the world and engage in educational seminars and premier discussion forums.

Heath Open Studio Events
May 9–11
The traditional Spring event, where Heath opens the doors to the factory and studio so visitors can explore both Heath's history, as well as current projects and collections, will be held at the company's San Franciso, Sausalito and Los Angeles locations.

Sonoma Living: Home Tours
May 10, 2014
AIA San Francisco and AIA Redwood Empire are excited to announce Sonoma Living: Home Tours, a new home tours program for 2014. Sonoma Living will showcase a wide variety of architectural styles, neighborhoods, and residences—all from the architect's point of view. The program provides design enthusiasts and the general public with an inside look into the world of distinctive residences in Sonoma county. Tour participants have the opportunity to see some of the area's latest residential projects from the inside out, meet design teams, explore housing trends, and discover design solutions that inspire unique Sonoma living.

de LaB Presents an Eastside Home Tour: Architects at Home
May 10, 2014
De LaB presents its second annual Eastside home tour, “Architects at Home,” on May 10th from 12:00-4:00 p.m. The popular tour will explore homes designed and built by architects for their own families. A sense of experimentation, playfulness, inspiration, and a creative approach to budget constraints pervade these homes.

The Venice Art Walk
May 18, 2014
The proud tradition of artists and volunteers providing health care to their neighbors in need and the celebration of Venice’s vibrant artistic culture continues today. This event is free and open to the public and features a highly anticipated 350 piece art auction, live entertainment, and an impressive lineup of gourmet food trucks. Participants can purchase tickets to highly regarded Architecture Tours that held throughout the year and/or view exclusive art studios that will be featured on the day of Venice Art Walk & Auctions.

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Celebrate: Groundswell
June 28, 2014
A+D Architecture and Design Museum > Los Angeles (A+D) celebrates its 13th year of cutting edge exhibitions and progressive architecture and design programs with its annual gala and fundraiser.

 

Competitions

Deadline: April 25
Call for Entries (Student Awards) 
ASLA

Deadline: May 18
Imagine Hillandale
Imagine Hillandale

Deadline: June 1 
AIA|LA 2014 Design Awards Program Registration 
AIA|LA

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden
« Book Review: On Bikes, in Paris | Main | Issue Extra: The (Re)Purpose of Design »
Wednesday
Jan292014

FORM on Design: Shaking up the Playground

Free Play's innovative new structures offer a new, child-directed and imaginative approach to play equipment. Image courtesy Free Play.

Anyone who has visited an American playground in the last few decades knows exactly what to expect. A slide, some swings, monkey bars, maybe a teeter-totter. And any child who has been to the same playgrounds will know exactly how to play on them. It means they’re safe and functional but also a little dull.

Dan Schreibman had that revelation about a decade ago when his first child was born. Searching for a backyard play set, he found them to be basically the same—pretty boring. As his children got older, “they played on it for 20 minutes, but they’d play with the fallen tree there for six hours,” says Schreibman, a management consultant by profession and now a playground evangelist by calling.

Seeing how his children played and learned led him down set him down a new path, as did a conversation with a cousin, who happened to be an architectural historian. Her book on American playgrounds prompted him to look even deeper into the subject, introducing him to experts also exploring the subject. 

Putting thought into action, Schreibman set up a competition, asking a group of architects to create new types of play structures that would be unique, offer limitless options for play; facilitate experiential learning; foster social interaction; enhance the setting no matter where it happened to be.

When all was said and done, designs by the firm LTL Architects won the day. “It hit on all cylinders,” says Schreibman.  “It was dramatically different and so incredibly thoughtful—living true to what we’re trying to accomplish.” The pieces in the new Free Play collection include the Ant Farm, a climbing structure; the Weeping Willow, a structure composed of long strands of rope (with added chimes, it creates an even more compelling experience); the Corn Field, consisting of flexible of vertical tubes; and the Maze, a series of cubes that can be configured in multiple ways.

The pieces are modular, scalable and customizable, meaning that no matter the needs of the space, the equipment can be tailored to match. Their design also ensures that small people will rarely tire of them and will find new and unexpected ways to explore and experience the structures. His own children, for example, continue to build elaborate houses out of the Weeping Willow’s ropes—something that delights Schreibman, who now finds himself experimenting with configurations on his own.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>