LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden

MONITOR

Thursday
May102012

Morphosis Selected to Design First Building at CornellNYC Tech

The Cooper Union, designed by Morphosis, in the East Village of New York CityLos Angeles Architect Thom Mayne’s firm Morphosis has been selected as the architect for the first of academic building to be built at Cornell University’s high-tech graduate school campus on Roosevelt Island in New York City. Talking to the New York Times about his latest contract, Mayne said that “The goal here is to develop a one-of-a-kind institution,” adding, “It’s got to start from rethinking — innovating — an environment.” Mayne has made famous work of academic contracts before—most notably the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in the East Village. As for what the new building will look like, Mayne tells the NYT that he hasn’t even seen the site plans yet, but he says, “[I like being able to tell you that I don’t have any bloody idea what it’s going to look like.” Skidmore, Owings & Merrill will continue its work with the 20-year build out of the Master Plan for the new campus. Groundbreaking for the Mayne building is expected by 2014, and project completion is expected by 2017.
An Architect’s Newspaper post has more details about the exciting design and engineering team assembled for the first building: “Morphosis will work with Arup as the engineer on the first building, which the team will design to meet a net-zero energy goal; James Corner is on board for landscape.”
The rendering for the CornellNYC Tech Master Plan courtesy of SOM
Friday
May042012

What to do this weekend: The AIA|LA Palisades to Brentwood Spring Home Tours

DeBont Residence (Michael Lehrer, FAIA - LEHRER ARCHITECTS LA, Inc.) Pacific Palisades - Mandeville Canyon The AIA|LA will take residential architecture fans west for round two of the 2012 Spring Home Tours Series this Sunday, May 6th. The event, sponsored by Gruen Associates, will feature designs by Warren W. Wagner, AIA; Barbara Callas, AIA; Michael Lehrer, FAIA; and William Hefner, AIA. The tour will make its way through some of the most pictaresque and architecture-savvy neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The opportunities to see homes like this are rare, so you don't want to miss it.

To purchase tickets, visit http://aialamay6hometour.eventbrite.com/
AIA Members: $65 (excluding applicable registration fees)
Non Members $75 (excluding applicable registration fees)

Cor-ten Cottage (Barbara Callas, AIA - Callas Architects, Inc.)Chautauqua Residence (William Hefner, AIA - William Hefner Architect, Inc.)Palleschi-Hart Residence (Warren W. Wagner, AIA - W3 Architects) Pacific Palisades, CA
Friday
May042012

Q&A: Calvin Abe, Landscape Architect and Co-Curator of Ecoartspace

Images by Hirokazu KosakaThe Japanese American Cultural & Community Center hosted its first annual spring festival, called the LA Bloom Festival, from April 27 to May 5. The centerpiece of the festival was the Ecoartspace installation, co-curated by local landscape architect Calvin Abe and JACCC Artistic Director Hirokazu Kosaka. Ecoartspace transformed the Noguchi Plaza into one of the world’s largest Zen gardens with over 5 million pebbles raked to create puddles of raindrops. To commemorate this space-activating endeavor combining landscape architecture, art, and Zen practice, FORM spoke with Ahbe Landscape Architects Principal Calvin Abe about the significance of the event.

Why is this activity of importance to the neighborhood or community? What is it about activating this plaza in this creative way that is compelling to you?

The Naguchi Plaza is owned by the Community Center as a non-profit organization. This is one of the only, if not the only, public plaza that is within the private domain. I guess LA Live is a public private space. This particular space has been there for over 30 years and was designed by Naguchi. It has always been kind of a hidden gem. It has been used as a focal point for community festivals and events, but it is offset and not terribly visible from the street. It doesn’t have a direct street presence because of the way that Naguchi designed the space. It has the quality of a secret garden. It is a secret public plaza space. Most people don’t know about it. This installation is one of many installations over the years to engage the people and the public, to bring people into the space, to let people know about this unique space in the Downtown community.

Besides the public and the private, the other mixing of worlds evident in this nine-day event is the blending of the traditional and the modern. Can you elaborate on how those dynamics played out over the course of the event?

I was thinking about the importance of the installation as the idea of the garden. This particular installation speaks to my interest in sustainability and the connection between human experience and nature. In this case, the simplicity of the modernist expression of the gravel gardens evokes what I call a spiritual experience. The natural environment, as with most Zen gardens, has to do with the inner workings of oneself—the contemplative qualities that the garden space can create. We had to create a garden space that was at scale that has a major presence. It is a spiritual space—that is a connection back to nature. That is part of the whole idea of ecoartspace.

Given your role in planning the event, what do JACCC stakeholders hope for from the event in terms of neighborhood revitalization? What makes Little Tokyo great and what investments could take the neighborhood to the next level of a livable and engaging community?

We are fortunate that the population of Downtown, in particular Little Tokyo, is shifting. We are now finding many residents in the area. Little Tokyo has become one of the major areas for night activities. It is very active in the evenings with youth and events and dining. The space is an opportunity for these types of events to occur to encourage further community, further community engagement, and a place to hang out. The whole week will see evening social events that we hope people will take part in. We’re really a part of a larger economic growth that is hapopening—I don’t know if it is growth, but it is definitely a shift. The Community Center wants to be a part of that so we aren’t just Japanese Americans, but we’re part of a larger urban fabric that can host activities Downtown.

How did you expertise and experience as a landscape architect help you curate the event?

There are two parts. One is a practical side. On the conceptual side is the relationship to the Zen Garden. Hirokazu Kosaka is the public artist that I worked with—we co-curated this installation. We were interested in transforming the plaza into a new experience. As a boardmember at the community center, I said, “why don’t we skew this installation to make sure we have an environmental plan.” Out of that I threw out the idea of Ecoartspace, and the comittee picked that up and pushed that idea. Because my background as a landscape architect includes a lot of work in sustainability and ecological systems approach to design, that’s how we collaborated. 

On the practical side, I had the 27 tons of gravel organized, delivered, and installed. I paid for it. I hired labor to spread it and install. There are three inches—a lot of gravel out there. I was able to make that happen through my industry connections .

LA Bloom concludes on May 5, so you have one last Saturday to check out the event.
 


Tuesday
May012012

Frank Gehry Designed Chess Set for Tiffany & Co.

Tiffany & Co. commissioned one of Los Angeles’s most famous starchitects, Frank Gehry, to design this strikingly modernist chess. Even the pawns, that uniform bastion at the front of the line, have unprecedented idiosyncrasies--each is adorned with cannons arranged at unique angles. According to a post by Architizer, “Each of the pieces is wrought in fine bone-china” and the entire set will go for $25,000. Deluxe Spain also explains that he game of chess is a passion for Gehry: “Gehry has said that what he likes most about his work is seen as ‘changing the architectural landscape’ as the game unfolds.”

Friday
Apr272012

RFP Now Available for LA's 6th Street Viaduct Design Competition

Image via bridgehunter.comLast week news broke of a design competition by the city of Los Angeles for a replacement for the 6th Street Viaduct that connects the Arts District with Boyle Heights on the east side of Downtown Los Angeles. The current 6th Street Viaduct, the most recognizable of the bridges that crosses the LA River, is a 3,500-foot art deco throwback that has been well documented in films, television, and commercials since it was constructed in 1932.  A type of “concrete cancer,” however, is destroying the bridge slowly from the inside out, necessitating a replacement rather than a renovation. Both the Design and Architecture show on KCRW and the Architect’s Newspaper provided full coverage of the competition, the announcement of which came as a happy surprise to architecture and bridge enthusiasts who lamented the utilitarian designs featured in the city’s earlier plans. The city has $401 million for a replacement bridge, with $50,000 available to competition finalists. The city has also announced that it intends for the design of the bridge to be a modern cable-stayed design.

According to the RFQ/RQP released on April 25, the design competition will occur in three stages, with an anticipated timeline of seven to eight weeks for project finalists to produce design proposals. The RFQ/P makes it clear that the design should be a “signature bridge” and allows a little room for flexibility within the cable-stayed format: “The aesthetics and number of towers for the new Viaduct is not fixed by the FEIR/FEIS.” The entire project is expected to take seven years.