LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter




Sponsors





Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

RICS Development Series Los Angeles 2014: Wilshire Grand Center
November 20, 2014
Join RICS Southern California chapter for the launch of their Los Angeles Development Series seminar, which takes an in-depth look at the development and construction of the upscale, world-class Wilshire Grand Project in downtown LA.

Innovation and Design Excellence in Healthcare Facilities Design: Today and Tomorrow
November 21, 2014
Hosted by AIA Los Angeles and AIA San Francisco, Future Care: Design for Health is a one-day healthcare symposium featuring the top minds in healthcare planning, design and construction. Speakers will address the rapidly changing healthcare environment and how these changes impact what healthcare providers need from the design and construction community.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden

MONITOR

Entries in architecture (76)

Monday
Nov172014

Book Review: Chinese Museums

Courtesy Princeton Architectural Press

By Michael Webb

New Museums in China. Clare Jacobsen. Princeton Architectural Press. $50.

An invaluable compilation of 50 museums, completed or begun in the past decade, all over China. Jacobsen has selected these projects for their architectural value, and she has cast a wide net, from MAD's Ordos Museum—a scale-less blob that anchors a raw new development in Inner Mongolia, to the Museum of Handcraft Paper, a woodsy cluster by Trace Architecture in a remote southwestern village. There's a good mix of Chinese and Western firms, and the Pritzker Prize laureates include Wang Shu of Hangzhou.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Nov122014

FORM Focus: SCAPE Comes to Los Angeles

Italian architecture firm recently opened an American location in Culver City, brining with them a warm, contemporary, thoroughly Italian aesthetic, as found in a design for a villa in Lugano. Image courtesy Scape.

With offices in Rome and Paris, SCAPE has established well-known profile throughout Europe since its founding in 2004. Recently, the architecture firm, known for its facilty on a range of projects, opened its first American outpost—in Culver City. Intrigued, we reached out to one of the firm's four co-founders, Paolo Mezzalana, to find out what prompted to move into the Los Angeles market. He shares the impulse behind it with us and fills us in on his thoughts on our architectural past, present and future.

Why did your firm choose to expand to Los Angeles?

LA has been in our hearts since 2009, when we worked on an incredible project Downtown (never completed). The singer, producer, actor, director and model Vincent Gallo asked us to do a design for his house and recording studio. The project lasted approximately one year, and we worked together with for a concept inspired by Italian design of the Seventies. It was a dream and as it often happens the dream didn't came true. But the love for Los Angeles became real and never passed. From a professional point of view we think that LA has a lot of potential for our work and our way of thinking about architecture. 

What is appealing about Los Angeles’s architectural culture?

It's may be not easy to understand, but for a European, Italian, Roman architect, Los Angeles is synonymous with freedom. What I want to say is that we are used to think, work, in a "milieu" that has a very old background of cultural rules. And sometimes these rules become unacceptable! Personally, every time that I'm in Los Angeles I feel free. The architectural culture of LA is open to new ideas, new experiences—the city doesn't judge you at all times. And you can feel it when you drive through the hills. You can admire a mix of styles that in Europe is not even thinkable. But this crazy  mix in some ways is in equilibrium (well, not always!). What keeps everything together is, first of all, nature. The relation between nature and urbanism in LA is so strong. The second binder is the infrastructures.

Finally what we really envy is your space. In Italy, we don't have any more space.

What will your firm contribute to our architectural culture?

We are Italians and we have a plus: We are used to studying and understanding the context. That means that we know how to make projects in harmony with the surroundings and the city. Then of course we have the Italian touch!

What sorts of projects will you be focusing on here in LA?

Architects are of course open to everything and our cv is a mix of very different programs and very different scales. (That's the concept of our name SCAPE: It's a suffix that doesn't exist alone. We chose it  to express that we work at different scales, from city-SCAPE to land-SCAPE). But in Los Angeles we are most of all interested in private houses, retail, renovation. 

What types of opportunities does working in LA bring?

The cultural scene of the city changed a lot in the last years. Los Angeles is the right place to meet interesting people that have something to say and to start new projects.

Finally, and most importantly, what do you think of the food scene here in Los Angeles?

I think that the food culture in LA is a mirror of what I said fabout the architectural culture. Los Angeles accepted all kind of influences from Europe,  sia, South America. At the beginning it was confused but now the food experience became very sophisticated. A few of the Italian restaurants in LA have a very high level

Having said that, to make me happy, bring me to Father's Office. I'm burger addicted.

Wednesday
Oct292014

Book Review: Architectural Character

 By Michael Webb

Nairn's London. Ian Nairn. Penguin Classics, £9.99.

There never was and probably never will be another architectural critic as impassioned, omnivorous, and outspoken as Ian Nairn (1930–1983). Largely self-taught, he conducted a one-man crusade against the outrages of post-war British architecture, which he contrasted with the best work of past centuries. But he was no reactionary: He found excellence and mediocrity in every era, dismissing one Gothic cathedral as mechanical and unfeeling—the same deficiencies he found in the widely acclaimed Royal Festival Hall of 1951. "What I am after," he wrote, "is character, or personality, or essence." He accepted the wartime destruction in London as the price paid to defeat evil; now "It is burning again, but this time only to satisfy developers' greed, planners' inadequacy, and official stupidity." 

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Oct222014

Wayback Wednesday: Michael Webb on Living in Color

Among contemporary urban environments, Rio's favelas are getting a hefty dose from Dutch artists Haas and Hahn. Photograph courtesy Favela Painting

Next week, our own Michael Webb, contributing writer to our print edition and frequent face here on the Web site with his pithy book and exhibition reviews, will receive a 2014 AIA|LA Design Advocate award at the ceremony. To celebrate his achievement, we thought we'd run one of our favorite recent features of Michael's his 2013 story on color in urban architecture. He traces its history and offers a compelling call to bring more of it into city living.

By Michael Webb

Most cities have a distinctive palette. In London, the older residential areas are built of yellow or red brick, the monuments of white Portland stone. Some are still blackened from coal smoke, others have been scrubbed clean. Looking over Paris from Sacré Coeur, the expanse of gray slate and stone is interrupted by the multicolored Pompidou Center—much as the PDC stands out in West Hollywood. St Petersburg is a joyful symphony of pale blue, green, yellow and pink.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Oct132014

Exhibitions: Florentine Sketchbook

Floretine architect Andrea Ponsi's sketches are featured at an exhibition at the Italian Cultural Institute in Los Angeles. Image courtesy Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles.

By Michael Webb

For centuries, architects sketched their work and recorded their impressions of the places they visited, and the Beaux Arts curriculum was based on a mastery of drawing. Software and digital cameras have eroded that tradition, but a few architects (Frank Gehry and Steven Holl are notable examples) still prefer pen and brush as tools to express their ideas. Andrea Ponsi is a Florentine architect whose watercolors of his native city are on display at the Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood through October 31. The exhibition, Andrea Ponsi: Florence, A Map of Perceptions, was organized by IIC Director Michela Magri, and it provides an insider's perspective on the cradle of Renaissance architecture.

Click to read more ...