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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

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Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
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Entries in Frederick Fisher (3)

Wednesday
Sep242014

Wayback Wednesday: AIA|LA Gold Medal Award Winner Frederick Fisher

Frederick Fisher's notable work includes Sunnylands Center and Gardens at Sunnylands. Image courtesy Frderick Fisher & Partners.

For this month's edition of Wayback Wednesday, we're re-running our January/February 2014 profile of architect Frederick Fisher, who receieved the 2013 AIA|LA Gold Medal. Here, we learn about his journey to architecture, the importance of Los Angeles's storied design legacy in his career and the ways art and artists have informed his work over the years.

By Lisa Bingham Dewart

When Scott Johnson called Frederick Fisher, the founder and principal of Frederick Fisher and Partners, and said he was nominating him for the 2013 AIA|LA Gold Medal, the architect was completely surprised. “I joked to my wife I had a Sally Field moment,” he recalls. “I was completely taken aback.” But those familiar with his work felt the accolade was well deserved, given his architectural accomplishments. They range from residences to academic buildings and public spaces, all conceived in a practice rooted in a broad cultural approach blending ideas from architecture and art.

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Tuesday
Feb252014

FORM Culture: Architecture for Art

Frederick Fisher carved the new Marc Selwyn Fine Art space out of a former auto body shop in Beverly Hills. Image courtesy, Marc Selwyn Fine Art. By Michael Webb

At a time when many architects are using and abusing parametrics to create look-at-me buildings, Frederick Fisher stays true to his principles. For the past 30 years he has been crafting spaces for the creation and display of art and they are often so understated as to go unremarked. Artists and gallerists know that he will make them look good, and his range of accomplishment is unmatched—from PS 1 in New York and the Colby Museum extension in Maine, to the Huntington in Pasadena and an art space for the Otis Institute. He transformed a decrepit tram depot into Bergamot Station, and designed several of its gallery interiors, in addition to a dozen more he has done across LA.

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Wednesday
Nov282012

Articulating Museum Spaces 

Every picture benefits from a good frame, and that principle also applies to museum installations. Three current exhibitions in LACMA’s Resnick Gallery reveal the sweep of Renzo Piano’s skylit expanse while enhancing the special qualities of old master paintings, minimalist sculpture, and colorful ceramics. The square space, walled in glass and white plaster, has been divided into three long rectangles. To the west, Frederick Fisher and Partners have inserted L-plan dividers, stippled in yellow ochre, to create semi-enclosed galleries for the display of gold-framed paintings by Caravaggio and his contemporaries. Benches of stacked felt punctuate the sequence and encourage visitors to linger and soak up the spirit of these theatrical canvases.  A central axis extends from a ghostly image of Caravaggio at the entry to Michael Heizer’s Levitated Mass beyond the glass wall at the far end, as though the artist were gazing out at this natural form.
Turn the corner and you find the entire central space is occupied by Water de Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture, a seried array of faceted white blocks arranged in a herringbone pattern. The repeated zig-zag rows extend back to the entry façade and a framed view of BCAM’s red steel staircase. The east side is devoted to a retrospective of the late Ken Price, a virtuoso ceramicist whose work ranges from whimsical tea cups to massive coiled forms in a dazzling palette of soft and vibrant colors. Frank Gehry loves Price’s work and has set it off within a sequence of rotated white cubes that rise to the ceiling and are cut away to frame and enclose key exhibits. Projecting hoods conceal down lighting and extend the cubes into the central axis, mirroring Fisher’s looser enclosures. Most visitors will focus on the artworks, as they should, for these structures are not meant to draw attention to themselves. Architects will appreciate the spatial contrast between the open volume at the center and the articulation of those to either side, and the way these scaling devices intensify your experience of the art.