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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

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Entries in Herman Miller (3)

Wednesday
Nov192014

Exhibitions: Becoming a Design Mecca

The history of the West Hollywood Design District gets an exhibition at the West Hollywood Public Library. It features rare archival material. Image courtesy West Hollywood Design District.

“They came because the rent was low. It was all warehouses and people could open showrooms and not pay the prices at the mart,” Greg Firlotte says of the beginnings of what was to become the West Hollywood Design District. “And it was unincorporated, so there were fewer restrictions and more freedom to do things you couldn’t within the city. There was a Wild West aspect where Bohemian types could start things.”

Firlotte, a Design District and design industry veteran, was tapped to curate a new exhibition, Decades of Design, 1948–2014, opening November 19, at the West Hollywood Library. The show traces the history of area via its story as a design mecca, from its beginnings in 1948, when the Carl Marias carpet showroom first opened (after moving several times, the company is still in business in WeHo). Other seminal events covered include the opening of the Eames-designed Herman Miller showroom and the arrival of the PDC in 1976. “The whole district changed dramatically then,” Firlotte points out. “It brought along a lot of other businesses.”

Many of the show’s images have never been seen by the public. “I started looking through personal and corporate archives,” says Firlotte. “I had a lot of ‘Oh my God’ moments,” he says, including coming across the first ever map of the district, published in 1964. He was able to mine Herman Miller's collection, that of Phyllis Morris and those of other notable firms and individuals.

Once the show closes, it will live on as a permanent online archive, preserving the legacy of a critical piece of design history. “There are a lot of things for the design to trade to discover,” notes Firlotte. 

Click here for more information about the show

Wednesday
Mar052014

FORM on Design: Iconic Modern Furniture Reissued

Herman Miller has updated some of its classic designs, including Eames Aluminum Group outdoor chairs. Image courtesy Herman Miller.

Living in the apartment where the Eames prototyped their first designs in the 1940s, I've always been fascinated by the subtle changes iconic pieces undergo as they are first put into production and later revived. Herman Miller, which began as a traditional Michigan furniture maker, was introduced to modernism by Gilbert Rhode in the 1930s, and again by George Nelson, who was their director of design, 1945-1972, a tenure no-one is ever likely to match. He designed an entire range of basic furniture himself in a year, and then brought in his friends, Charles and Ray Eames, who have been the company's household gods ever since. Over the years, as Herman Miller put a greater emphasis on the contract market, some of the Eames's designs went out of production. A few were pirated, European rights went to Vitra, but most of the drop-outs have been brought back in sparkling new editions.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Oct062010

"Sayl" Chairs Combine Beauty of Sailboats and Principles of Suspension Bridges

This new chair is designed by Yves Béhar in collaboration with Herman Miller. It was inspired by the engineering principles of a suspension bridge and the elegance of a sail, explaining its moniker, the Sayl chair. Hailing from San Francisco, Béhar looked to the city's iconic Golden Gate Bridge for inspiration. The spine of the seat back reflects the structure of the bridge, and the full, light shape of the mesh material alludes to the sail, just as the Golden Gate is often surrounded by the distintive sails from nearby sailboats. The chair is also manufactured with minimal environmental impact.