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Events

Design for Social Impact
May 25–August 3, 2014
Based on the idea that design is a way of looking at the world with an eye for changing it, the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA) presents Design for Social Impact, an original exhibition offering a look at how designers, engineers, students, professors, architects and social entrepreneurs use design to solve the problems of the 21st century.

Japanese Design Today 100
June 27–July 19, 2014
The Japan Foundation presents the World premiere of the exhibition Japanese Design Today 100, which opens at UCLA’s Department of Architecture & Urban Design at Perloff Hall. This exhibition showcases the Designscape of contemporary Japan through 100 objects of Japanese design: 89 objects created since 2010 that are well known in Japan, as well as 11 objects that represent the origin of Japanese post-war modern product design. These 100 product designs are displayed in 10 categories: Classic Japanese Design, Furniture & Housewares, Tableware & Cookware, Apparel & Accessories, Children, Stationery, Hobbies, Healthcare, Disaster Relief, and Transportation.

BAM/PFA New Building Topping Out Celebration
July 17, 2014
Construction is nearing midpoint at the downtown Berkeley site of the future home of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA). Workers will soon be erecting the last of the steel beams that form the frame of this dynamic building. To celebrate this important milestone, BAM/PFA invites its Bay Area friends and neighbors to a “topping out” ceremony on Addison Street, between Shattuck Avenue and Oxford Street.

39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show
August 8–10, 2014

The American Craft Council returns to San Francisco for its 39th Annual American Craft Council San Francisco Show this August 8-10, 2014 at Fort Mason Center. As the largest juried fine craft show on the West Coast, the 2014 San Francisco Show is expected to draw more than 12,000 fine craft collectors and design enthusiasts.

Conversations in Place 2014
August 10, 2014
ow in its third year, Conversations in Place 2014 begins another series of illuminating explorations of “Southern California – Yesterday and Tomorrow” at the historic Rancho Los Alamitos. The 4-part series begins Sunday, August 10 and continues through Sunday, November 2. The series begins with W. Richard West, Jr, President and CEO of The Autry National Center of the American West, Milford Wayne Donaldson, FAIA, chairman of the United States Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Pamela Seager, Executive Director of Rancho Los Alamitos, and Architect Stephen Farneth, FAIA, founding partner of the award-winning historic preservation firm Architectural Resources Group, in conversation about the place of museums and historic sites in shaping the story of Southern California. Can these institutions escape the straightjacket of the time to better interpret history to the 21st century?

NOW AND NEXT 2014 Symposium on Technology for Design and Construction
August 13–15, 2014
Meet thought leaders and colleagues interested in architecture, engineering, construction, open BIM Exchange, software trends and more. Learn about the innovations that are moving companies and people forward
including: where and how design and delivery is shifting; which software applications are transformative; best practices for collaborative project delivery; how to engage with the global BIM community. Connect with and hear from the best and the brightest such as Jordan Brandt, AutoDesk; Deke Smith, buildingSMART alliance; Ray Topping, Fiatech; Bill East, Prairie  Sky Consulting (formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers).

Archtoberfest San Diego 2014
October 1–30, 2014
Archtoberfest San Diego 2014 is a collaboratively-operated initiative aimed at establishing an annual, month-long program of public events and activities pertaining to architecture, design, planning and sustainability.

New Urbanism Film Festival
November 2014
The primary goal of the New Urbanism Film Festival is to renew the dialogue about urban planning with a broader audience. The Festival brings in movies, short films, speakers, on the topics of architecture, public health, bicycle advocacy, urban design, public transit, inner-city gardens, to name a few. 

 

Competitions

Deadline: August 18
Fabric
Formabilio


Deadline: September 2
Hansgrohe+Axor Das Design Competition
Hansgrohe+Axor


Deadline: September 5

2014 Designer Dream Bath Competition
Duravit

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

FORM Event Images

Industry Partners

  

  




















 

Hidden

MONITOR

Entries in Hirokazu Kosaka (1)

Friday
May042012

Q&A: Calvin Abe, Landscape Architect and Co-Curator of Ecoartspace

Images by Hirokazu KosakaThe Japanese American Cultural & Community Center hosted its first annual spring festival, called the LA Bloom Festival, from April 27 to May 5. The centerpiece of the festival was the Ecoartspace installation, co-curated by local landscape architect Calvin Abe and JACCC Artistic Director Hirokazu Kosaka. Ecoartspace transformed the Noguchi Plaza into one of the world’s largest Zen gardens with over 5 million pebbles raked to create puddles of raindrops. To commemorate this space-activating endeavor combining landscape architecture, art, and Zen practice, FORM spoke with Ahbe Landscape Architects Principal Calvin Abe about the significance of the event.

Why is this activity of importance to the neighborhood or community? What is it about activating this plaza in this creative way that is compelling to you?

The Naguchi Plaza is owned by the Community Center as a non-profit organization. This is one of the only, if not the only, public plaza that is within the private domain. I guess LA Live is a public private space. This particular space has been there for over 30 years and was designed by Naguchi. It has always been kind of a hidden gem. It has been used as a focal point for community festivals and events, but it is offset and not terribly visible from the street. It doesn’t have a direct street presence because of the way that Naguchi designed the space. It has the quality of a secret garden. It is a secret public plaza space. Most people don’t know about it. This installation is one of many installations over the years to engage the people and the public, to bring people into the space, to let people know about this unique space in the Downtown community.

Besides the public and the private, the other mixing of worlds evident in this nine-day event is the blending of the traditional and the modern. Can you elaborate on how those dynamics played out over the course of the event?

I was thinking about the importance of the installation as the idea of the garden. This particular installation speaks to my interest in sustainability and the connection between human experience and nature. In this case, the simplicity of the modernist expression of the gravel gardens evokes what I call a spiritual experience. The natural environment, as with most Zen gardens, has to do with the inner workings of oneself—the contemplative qualities that the garden space can create. We had to create a garden space that was at scale that has a major presence. It is a spiritual space—that is a connection back to nature. That is part of the whole idea of ecoartspace.

Given your role in planning the event, what do JACCC stakeholders hope for from the event in terms of neighborhood revitalization? What makes Little Tokyo great and what investments could take the neighborhood to the next level of a livable and engaging community?

We are fortunate that the population of Downtown, in particular Little Tokyo, is shifting. We are now finding many residents in the area. Little Tokyo has become one of the major areas for night activities. It is very active in the evenings with youth and events and dining. The space is an opportunity for these types of events to occur to encourage further community, further community engagement, and a place to hang out. The whole week will see evening social events that we hope people will take part in. We’re really a part of a larger economic growth that is hapopening—I don’t know if it is growth, but it is definitely a shift. The Community Center wants to be a part of that so we aren’t just Japanese Americans, but we’re part of a larger urban fabric that can host activities Downtown.

How did you expertise and experience as a landscape architect help you curate the event?

There are two parts. One is a practical side. On the conceptual side is the relationship to the Zen Garden. Hirokazu Kosaka is the public artist that I worked with—we co-curated this installation. We were interested in transforming the plaza into a new experience. As a boardmember at the community center, I said, “why don’t we skew this installation to make sure we have an environmental plan.” Out of that I threw out the idea of Ecoartspace, and the comittee picked that up and pushed that idea. Because my background as a landscape architect includes a lot of work in sustainability and ecological systems approach to design, that’s how we collaborated. 

On the practical side, I had the 27 tons of gravel organized, delivered, and installed. I paid for it. I hired labor to spread it and install. There are three inches—a lot of gravel out there. I was able to make that happen through my industry connections .

LA Bloom concludes on May 5, so you have one last Saturday to check out the event.