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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Entries in LACMA (8)

Monday
Oct272014

Exhibition Review: Armor as Art Work

LACMA hosts Samurai: Japanese Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection, which showcases battle gear for high-ranking warriors from the 14th through the 19th centuries. Image courtesy LACMA.

By Michael Webb

Does everyone realize what a treasure LACMA is, and how far it has come in its 50 years as a stand-alone art museum? An encyclopedic, constantly growing collection is augmented by loan exhibitions, such as Haunted Screens, and two complementary shows on the military arts of pre-modern Japan. Samurai: Japanese Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection has been seen in other museums, but one doubts it exerted the power it has here in an inspired installation by wHY Architecture in the Resnick Pavilion. From November 1st it will be complemented by Art of the Samurai: Swords, Paintings, Prints and Textiles, an exhibition of LACMA holdings and loans from local collectors. 

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Monday
Dec022013

Exhibition Review: Calder Explores the Third and Fourth Dimensions

Calder and Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic November 24, 2013–July 27, 2014 Los Angeles County Museum of Art © Calder Foundation, New York, photo © Fredrik Nilsen.

By Michael Webb

Forget the shopping and enjoy the best seasonal gift that you or your friends could imagine: LACMA’s pitch-perfect Alexander Calder retrospective. Curated by Stephanie Barron and installed by Frank Gehry in the Resnick Gallery, it’s an ideal fusion of art and architecture, form and space, stillness and motion. Calder and Abstraction, from Avant-Garde to Iconic comprises 50 sculptures and maquettes that trace the artist’s career from 1931 to 1975, the year before his death. Most are grouped in shallow curved bays to encourage visitors to focus on one at a time and surrender to their leisurely rhythms. Gazing at the mobiles as a current of air animates one part and then another, you realize that Calder took the surreal abstractions of Joan Miró, whom he met in Paris in 1928, and added the third dimension of depth and the fourth of time. The compositions are constantly shifting so that each mobile incorporates a multitude.

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Monday
Jul012013

Exhibitions: The Art of Light [UPDATED]

By Michael Webb

James Turrell got his start in an abandoned hotel in Ocean Park, creating openings to admit light in precisely controlled ways. Robert Irwin was a near neighbor, conducting similar experiments with scrim, but he has since moved on to undertake a diversity of sculptural projects that include the Getty’s sunken garden and plantings at LACMA. Turrell has remained true to light, treating it as a physical substance and exploring the mysteries of visual perception. Major exhibitions at LACMA, the New York Guggenheim and the Houston Museum of Fine Arts celebrate the genius of this American artist, and provide a unique opportunity to explore the full range of his work.

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Wednesday
Nov282012

Articulating Museum Spaces 

Every picture benefits from a good frame, and that principle also applies to museum installations. Three current exhibitions in LACMA’s Resnick Gallery reveal the sweep of Renzo Piano’s skylit expanse while enhancing the special qualities of old master paintings, minimalist sculpture, and colorful ceramics. The square space, walled in glass and white plaster, has been divided into three long rectangles. To the west, Frederick Fisher and Partners have inserted L-plan dividers, stippled in yellow ochre, to create semi-enclosed galleries for the display of gold-framed paintings by Caravaggio and his contemporaries. Benches of stacked felt punctuate the sequence and encourage visitors to linger and soak up the spirit of these theatrical canvases.  A central axis extends from a ghostly image of Caravaggio at the entry to Michael Heizer’s Levitated Mass beyond the glass wall at the far end, as though the artist were gazing out at this natural form.
Turn the corner and you find the entire central space is occupied by Water de Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture, a seried array of faceted white blocks arranged in a herringbone pattern. The repeated zig-zag rows extend back to the entry façade and a framed view of BCAM’s red steel staircase. The east side is devoted to a retrospective of the late Ken Price, a virtuoso ceramicist whose work ranges from whimsical tea cups to massive coiled forms in a dazzling palette of soft and vibrant colors. Frank Gehry loves Price’s work and has set it off within a sequence of rotated white cubes that rise to the ceiling and are cut away to frame and enclose key exhibits. Projecting hoods conceal down lighting and extend the cubes into the central axis, mirroring Fisher’s looser enclosures. Most visitors will focus on the artworks, as they should, for these structures are not meant to draw attention to themselves. Architects will appreciate the spatial contrast between the open volume at the center and the articulation of those to either side, and the way these scaling devices intensify your experience of the art.

 

Thursday
Jan262012

Ellsworth Kelly Exhibits at LACMA and Matthew Marks

Ellsworth Kelly, Colors on a Grid, 1976Showing at LACMA from January 22 through April 22, Ellsworth Kelly: Prints and Paintings is the first retrospective examination of Kelly’s exceedingly prolific print practice since 1988. The exhibition includes over 100 prints, the majority from the collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, and five paintings. The exhibition is organized thematically to explore Kelly’s mastery of key formal motifs: grids, contrast and curves.

The new Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood also recently opened Ellsworth Kelly: Los Angeles, which includes six new two-panel paintings, all of which are being exhibited for the first time. Also on view are a group of 1952-54 collages, including Study for Black and White Panels, and the 1966 painting Black Over White. The facade of the newly constructed building also features an installation of a large Kelly sculpture, creating a striking example of minimalism in a city known more for colored glass. The new Matthew Marks Gallery was designed by Culver City-based architecture firm ZELLNERPLUS.