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Events

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
September 12–December 12, 2014
With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings.

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

Heath Ceramics Annual Sale
November 21–25, 2014
Heath's annual sale at their locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sausalito offer deals on merchandise along with special presentations.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

 

 

Competitions

Registration Opens: October 1
Breaking New Ground
The California Endowment

Deadlne: November 30
Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award
International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA)

Deadline: December 8

2015 Diversity Scholarship
Gensler

Deadline: December 15
2015 Preservation Awards
Santa Monica Conservancy 

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

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Entries in Le Corbusier (4)

Tuesday
Sep102013

Book Review: A Fresh Look at Le Corbusier

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret). (French, born Switzerland. 1887-1965). Urban plan for Rio de Janeiro. 1929. Aerial perspective with Guanabara Bay, the center and the beaches. Charcoal and pastel on paper. 29 15/16 x 31 11/16” (76 x 80.5 cm). Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLCBy Michael Webb

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes. Jean-Louis Cohen. MoMA, $75.

It’s ironic that MoMA presented one of the finest architectural exhibitions in years just as Barry Bergdoll, its widely admired curator of architecture, was stepping down, and its director was threatening to demolish the American Folk Art Museum—an architectural gem. Clearly, the gulf between the suits and the creatives yawns wide. If you missed the exhibition (and who wants to suffer New York in summer) you can catch it in Barcelona and Madrid next year. However, this companion book may prove more rewarding. A major reappraisal of a 20th-century master demands patient study of pictures, drawings and text, rather than abbreviated glimpses in a crowded gallery. From the seductive images of Richard Pare to the many essays that chart Corbu’s travels and his response to landscapes, this is a compelling, beautifully produced study that far outshines most books on the architect. 

Click to read more ...

Friday
Jan112013

Le Corbusier Exhibition at MoMA Will Be NYC's Largest

Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret). Urban Plan for Algiers, project Plan and perspective. 1935. Pastel on paper. 39 3/4 x 109 1/2″ (101 x 278.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Robert A. Jacobs. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLCSave the date for a very exciting upcoming exhibition in New York. For the first time in its history, MoMA will presents a major exhibition on the work of the influential and revered Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, 1887–1965). The exhibit, titled Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes, will encompass his work as architect, interior designer, artist, city planner, writer, and photographer. And don’t forget the superlatives: according to the MoMA’s website, the presentation will be the “largest exhibition ever produced in New York of his prodigious oeuvre.” Running from June 9–September 23, 2013, the exhibition will be organized by guest curator Jean-Louis Cohen with Barry Bergdoll, the MoMA’s Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design.

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Monday
Jan302012

The Modern Architecture Game from NEXT Architects

Image courtesy of NEXT Architects via ArchinectAmsterdam- and Beijing-based NEXT Architects recently announced the release of the Modern Architecture Game--think Trivial Pursuit for the circular-lens-wearing set. The game includes almost 1,000 questions in six categories: Visuals, Architect, Project, Style, Influence, and Quote. According to a recent post about the game by Archinect, sample questions will include require such information as “who designed the TWA terminal at JFK Airport, NY. And in which year was CIAM founded, 1928, 1938 or 1948.” The architecture theme is faithfully maintained throughout, with a game board that recreates a construction drawing and miniatures of six famous buildings for game pieces. Game play also involves wearing a pair of glasses that should remind everyone of a certain Swiss architect (hint: it’s Le Corbusier).

 

Friday
Feb192010

Inspired Match - How Patronage Drives Architecture

From Medici to Marx, how patronage drives architecture and what we can learn from it today.

By John Gendall

Nottingham Science Park, Image: Martine Hamilton-KnightHistorians position the Renaissance’s birth in Florence, Italy around the year 1400. They give it this coordinate in place and time because of a perfect storm of conditions: a wealth of talent pouring out from several accomplished workshops (Lorenzo Ghiberti, Fra Angelico, and Filipo Brunelleschi), a thriving economy owing to bustling trade, and, importantly, an ambitious and tasteful patron of the arts, the Medici family, willing to invest in provocative new art and architecture. In the midst of the Bubonic Plague, the revelation of the Florentine patrons served as a guiding light, paving they way for the exquisite work of the high renaissance. In other words, without the Medicis, there would have been no Michelangelo.

The same relationship between patron and architect carries through architectural history, with nobility, religious leaders, business owners tapping

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