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The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

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Entries in Los Angeles (38)

Wednesday
Nov262014

Wayback Wednesday: The Evolution of Place: LA

Elleven, part of the South Collection from the South Group, marked one of the first residential high rises to be built in Downtown LA since the 1970s. Image courtesy The South Group.Over the last few months, we've been featuring some favorite articles from our past issues to celebrate our 15th year. Today, we bring you a feature from our May/June 2007, one of the first to be available in print and online. The territory covered is one we're passionate about here at FORM—the evolution of Los Angeles. Written now over seven years ago, we hope it gives you a chance to think back and forward about our dynamic city. 

By John Southern

Step out of your car on a typical residential street in the San Fernando Valley or West Los Angeles, and all you may hear is the far off hum of traffic doing its mechanical Foxtrot on one of the region’s many freeways. The density is remarkably horizontal in nature; there is little evidence that you are in a metropolitan area of more than 13 million people. Fly into Los Angeles, however, and you get an entirely different picture. The Los Angeles metropolitan region stretches out before your eyes, seemingly infinite in its scope—an almost unfathomable conglomeration of freeways and streets, industrial districts, parks, downtowns, and residential neighborhoods. Hundreds of cities form an urban patchwork of hyper-development that only in recent years has begun to show signs of slowing its outward march into the surrounding desert.

Because the city has traditionally eschewed verticality in favor of flatness, Los Angeles is poised to evolve into a vibrant hybrid of hyper-stratified urbanity and suburban expansiveness in the twenty-first century as it introduces denser (and it is assumed more vertical) housing conditions atop the lower density of the suburban strip. This hybrid has the potential to redefine the way we understand both urban and suburban domestic environments, as these two housing typologies collide to produce a context that questions the very definition of what a city can be.

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Wednesday
Nov122014

FORM Focus: SCAPE Comes to Los Angeles

Italian architecture firm recently opened an American location in Culver City, brining with them a warm, contemporary, thoroughly Italian aesthetic, as found in a design for a villa in Lugano. Image courtesy Scape.

With offices in Rome and Paris, SCAPE has established well-known profile throughout Europe since its founding in 2004. Recently, the architecture firm, known for its facilty on a range of projects, opened its first American outpost—in Culver City. Intrigued, we reached out to one of the firm's four co-founders, Paolo Mezzalana, to find out what prompted to move into the Los Angeles market. He shares the impulse behind it with us and fills us in on his thoughts on our architectural past, present and future.

Why did your firm choose to expand to Los Angeles?

LA has been in our hearts since 2009, when we worked on an incredible project Downtown (never completed). The singer, producer, actor, director and model Vincent Gallo asked us to do a design for his house and recording studio. The project lasted approximately one year, and we worked together with for a concept inspired by Italian design of the Seventies. It was a dream and as it often happens the dream didn't came true. But the love for Los Angeles became real and never passed. From a professional point of view we think that LA has a lot of potential for our work and our way of thinking about architecture. 

What is appealing about Los Angeles’s architectural culture?

It's may be not easy to understand, but for a European, Italian, Roman architect, Los Angeles is synonymous with freedom. What I want to say is that we are used to think, work, in a "milieu" that has a very old background of cultural rules. And sometimes these rules become unacceptable! Personally, every time that I'm in Los Angeles I feel free. The architectural culture of LA is open to new ideas, new experiences—the city doesn't judge you at all times. And you can feel it when you drive through the hills. You can admire a mix of styles that in Europe is not even thinkable. But this crazy  mix in some ways is in equilibrium (well, not always!). What keeps everything together is, first of all, nature. The relation between nature and urbanism in LA is so strong. The second binder is the infrastructures.

Finally what we really envy is your space. In Italy, we don't have any more space.

What will your firm contribute to our architectural culture?

We are Italians and we have a plus: We are used to studying and understanding the context. That means that we know how to make projects in harmony with the surroundings and the city. Then of course we have the Italian touch!

What sorts of projects will you be focusing on here in LA?

Architects are of course open to everything and our cv is a mix of very different programs and very different scales. (That's the concept of our name SCAPE: It's a suffix that doesn't exist alone. We chose it  to express that we work at different scales, from city-SCAPE to land-SCAPE). But in Los Angeles we are most of all interested in private houses, retail, renovation. 

What types of opportunities does working in LA bring?

The cultural scene of the city changed a lot in the last years. Los Angeles is the right place to meet interesting people that have something to say and to start new projects.

Finally, and most importantly, what do you think of the food scene here in Los Angeles?

I think that the food culture in LA is a mirror of what I said fabout the architectural culture. Los Angeles accepted all kind of influences from Europe,  sia, South America. At the beginning it was confused but now the food experience became very sophisticated. A few of the Italian restaurants in LA have a very high level

Having said that, to make me happy, bring me to Father's Office. I'm burger addicted.

Wednesday
Oct222014

Wayback Wednesday: Michael Webb on Living in Color

Among contemporary urban environments, Rio's favelas are getting a hefty dose from Dutch artists Haas and Hahn. Photograph courtesy Favela Painting

Next week, our own Michael Webb, contributing writer to our print edition and frequent face here on the Web site with his pithy book and exhibition reviews, will receive a 2014 AIA|LA Design Advocate award at the ceremony. To celebrate his achievement, we thought we'd run one of our favorite recent features of Michael's his 2013 story on color in urban architecture. He traces its history and offers a compelling call to bring more of it into city living.

By Michael Webb

Most cities have a distinctive palette. In London, the older residential areas are built of yellow or red brick, the monuments of white Portland stone. Some are still blackened from coal smoke, others have been scrubbed clean. Looking over Paris from Sacré Coeur, the expanse of gray slate and stone is interrupted by the multicolored Pompidou Center—much as the PDC stands out in West Hollywood. St Petersburg is a joyful symphony of pale blue, green, yellow and pink.

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Tuesday
Sep162014

Showroom: Moore + Friesl's New C2 Credenza

Moore + Friesl's newest arrival into their collection of furnishings is the C2 Credenza. It features a high-glass finish and accents of bright color and light. Image courtesy Moore + Firesl.

The innovative LA–based architecture firm Moore + Friesl Design Group is at it again. They’re introducing the C2 Credenza. It joins their earlier C1 Credenza, a compelling piece formed in part using a folded piece metal to create its frame. This time, the duo used Senoplast, a high-gloss furniture film for the bold, rectilinear piece. UV-resistant, recyclable and PVC-free, the material bonds over a wood substrate to create high performance finish that’s scratch resistant.

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Tuesday
Jul152014

The FORM Questionnaire: Talking to Terri Moore

At Moore + Friesl Design Group, the firm she co-founded, Terri Moore's projects have included Van Cleef & Arpels' Fifth Avenue showroom in Manhattan. There, Moore and her team were tasked with developing specific pieces, including sales and display tables, podiums, pedestals, belles, a dining table and a reception desk, following concepts created by Jouin Manku of Paris. Image courtesy courtesy of Van Cleef and Arpels.Since Terri Moore and Marcus Friesl founded LA–based Moore + Friesl Design Group in 2011, the pair have taken on international architectural projects in the worlds art, fashion and finance, producing tour-de-force work generated from their facility with cutting-edge software and deep knowlege of high tech materials and their properties. At the firm, Moore, who caught the design bug early from her interior designer mother, works on project management and as a project designer. She's also actively involved in the Step Up Network, which mentors young girls for college and professional careers. With such wide-ranging interests, we were intrigued to hear her thoughts on design and architecture, and she gladly obliged. Here, she shares her passion for design–and Nutella.

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