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Events

The West Hollywood Design District Presents Decades of Design 1948–2014
November 19, 2014–February 2015
The first-ever retrospective exhibition uncovering, examining and celebrating six decades of rich design history in West Hollywood. The curated ­­gallery will showcase design pioneers and present tastemakers through bold graphics, photographs and original product.

FOG Design + Art Fair
January 15–18, 2015
Benefiting the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), FOG Design+Art is a four-day celebration and exploration of modern and contemporary design, architecture, and art with dynamic exhibits, custom installations, art galleries, lectures, and discussions with leaders in the art and design worlds.

Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio
February 20–May 24, 2015
This February, the Hammer Museum will present the West Coast debut of Provocations: The Architecture and Design of Heatherwick Studio, featuring the imaginative work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick and his London-based studio. Heatherwick is known for his unique design concepts ranging from products, such as a handbag for Longchamp, to large-scale structures like the new distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin.

 

 

Competitions

Deadline: December 31
Kitchen Design Contest
Wolf and Sub-Zero 

Deadline: January 16
Ceramics of Italy Tile Competition 2015
Ceramics of Italy 

Deadline: February 23
I Like Design
Interiors & Sources 

FORM Event Images

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Entries in Michael Webb (16)

Wednesday
Dec032014

Web Extra: Small Spaces

Michael Webb explores the growing popularity of small spaces, including a microloft project in Vancouver by NMDA. Rendering courtesy NMDA.

By Michael Webb

As real estate values skyrocket, young professionals who want to live in the heart of big cities on a budget are increasingly drawn to micro apartments that provide them with a minimum of private space as an alternative to sharing. Living small is nothing new. The poor have always endured cramped quarters—from primitive huts to tenements or trailers—and the homeless are grateful for a modest room in an SRO. Le Corbusier and his wife spent many summers in their 12-foot-square cabin in Roquebrune.  When he first visited India to design Chandigarh, the master said he couldn't improve on the versatility of the linear shacks that families construct from scavenged materials beside major highways. Little has changed since then. A few years ago, architect Bijoy Jain showed me through such a shelter outside his studio in Bombay; it was a marvel of ingenuity, impeccably maintained, and he was greeted as a welcome guest.

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Wednesday
Oct222014

Wayback Wednesday: Michael Webb on Living in Color

Among contemporary urban environments, Rio's favelas are getting a hefty dose from Dutch artists Haas and Hahn. Photograph courtesy Favela Painting

Next week, our own Michael Webb, contributing writer to our print edition and frequent face here on the Web site with his pithy book and exhibition reviews, will receive a 2014 AIA|LA Design Advocate award at the ceremony. To celebrate his achievement, we thought we'd run one of our favorite recent features of Michael's his 2013 story on color in urban architecture. He traces its history and offers a compelling call to bring more of it into city living.

By Michael Webb

Most cities have a distinctive palette. In London, the older residential areas are built of yellow or red brick, the monuments of white Portland stone. Some are still blackened from coal smoke, others have been scrubbed clean. Looking over Paris from Sacré Coeur, the expanse of gray slate and stone is interrupted by the multicolored Pompidou Center—much as the PDC stands out in West Hollywood. St Petersburg is a joyful symphony of pale blue, green, yellow and pink.

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Monday
Sep302013

EVENTS: WestEdge Is This Week

There’s a new design fair in town—WestEdge. Bringing together some 150 national and international brands, the event is the brainchild of Megan Reilly and Troy Hanson, who have produced and managed some of the biggest design events around (think ICFF, NeoCon and the Architectural Digest Home Design Show). For Reilly, and Hanson it’s the right fair at the right time. “Our clients and partners have been encouraging us to launch an event on the West Coast for years given the demand for a premium design fair in this region,” she says. “Los Angeles is experiencing a renaissance of sorts as it relates to art and design, architecture and manufacturing, and that momentum is a very exciting thing to be a part of and something we felt needed to be celebrated.” 

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Monday
Aug262013

Book Review: Looking at Books

By Michael Webb

The Book of Books: 500 Years of Graphic Innovation. Edited by Mathieu Lommen. Thames & Hudson, $65.

Too many obituaries for the printed word have appeared on-line, and most will vanish into the virtual wasteland that swallows most digital utterances. Print has survived for more than five centuries and it will take more than Twitter and blogs to render it obsolete. Rather, we seem to be returning to the Middle Ages, when a well-educated minority read books and everyone else relied on preachers and gossip. So, three cheers for Thames & Hudson, which continues to publish inspiring titles even as their competitors dumb down. 

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Wednesday
Jun052013

Issue Preview: Our Summer Issue Debuts Soon

Our summer issue is shaping up to be a great one with an exciting international focus. On tap, Michael Webb recalls a visit to 2013 Pritzker Prize–winner Toyo Ito’s home and shares his experiences visiting some of the architect’s other notable buildings. Webb also turns his attention to the challenges (and opportunities) facing architects and designers in booming South Korea. From Cambodia, we bring you the story of the New Khmer Architecture of the 1950s and ’60s, and the battle to preserve its rapidly disappearing legacy.

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